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Monday, 07 March 2011 12:53

Google uses kill switch to remove malicious apps

Written by Nick Farell
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Gone from the market and seen to be removed from your phone
Google has removed several malicious apps from its Android Market and will use the android kill switch to remove them from users' devices.

Those running an Android version earlier than version 2.2.2 were vulnerable to the rogue apps. Fifty-eight malicious apps were identified and removed last week but not before they were downloaded to about 260,000 devices.


Google said it would use a kill switch to remotely remove the apps from users' devices and push an Android security update to affected users to repair the damage done by the apps. The search engine will be sending out an email explaining what is happening.

The developer accounts associated with the apps were suspended and Inspector Knacker has been informed.
The applications were pirated versions of legitimate apps on the Android Market that were infected by a Trojan called DroidDream, which uses a root exploit dubbed "rageagainstthecage”.

The malware captured user and product information from a device and had the ability to download more dodgy code.


Nick Farell

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