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Wednesday, 16 March 2011 10:53

Apple is slowing down other people's apps

Written by Nick Farell
apple

Trying to make its own products seen better
Fruity peddler of broken iDreams, Apple has been slowing down the applications of other people in its iTunes store to make its own products appear better. According to the Register, the Apple's iOS mobile operating system runs web applications at significantly slower speeds when they're launched from the iPhone or iPad home screen in "full-screen mode" as opposed to in the Apple Safari browser.

The operating system also hampers the performance of these apps in other ways. The Register is not sure if these are accidental bugs or issues consciously introduced by Apple. One mobile developer said that Apple is basically using subtle defects to make web apps appear to be low quality – even when they claim HTML5 is a fully supported platform.

Apple is refusing to comment of course. Alex Kessinger, a mobile application developer and blogger who has focused on building web-standards-based apps for the iPhone said that Apple was not using the new JavaScript engine with applications that launch from the home screen.

Home screen web apps" can't use various web caching systems, including the HTML5 Application Cache, which means they can't be cached to run offline. They can't be rendered using Apple's newer "asynchronous mode" and have to use the old "synchronous mode", which means means they don't quite look as good.

More here.


Nick Farell

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