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Friday, 18 March 2011 11:50

EU confirms the right to be forgotten

Written by Nick Farell
eu

We can't remember why
EU Justice Commissioner Vivian Reding has confirmed that she would move to legislate the “right to be forgotten” into European Law Speaking to the European parliament, Ms Reding said that a US-based social network company(i.e. Facebook) that has millions of active users in Europe needs to comply with EU rules.

Facebook and other social networks will need to make stringent data privacy settings the default position for users, and to give them control over their own information, she said. People shall have the right to withdraw their consent to data processing and the burden of proof should be on data controllers – those who process the personal data, she said.

National privacy bodies, such as Britain's Information Commissioner, will get powers to examine and potentially prosecute companies. Under the new legislation, users could sue websites for invading their privacy. They would have a right to be entirely “forgotten” online.


Nick Farell

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