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Monday, 21 March 2011 12:42

Blackberrys warn of doom

Written by Nick Farell
y_globe

Early warning system launched in the Philippines
A Philippine charity has  launched an early warning system for disaster-prone areas using Blackberry devices and laptops. The gear is linked to a  sms that alerts the communities to typhoons, storm surges, tsunamis, landslides and earthquakes.

The Philippine Business for Social Progress (PBSP) has launched the 200,000-dollar project which is backed by the World Bank and one of the country's leading mobile phone operators. It will cover all in Southern Leyte province in the central Visayas region, which lies along a fault line and is also often battered by powerful typhoons.

The project's web-based information system enables officials from the towns to use BlackBerries and laptops to access and quickly spread alerts or store surveillance data. The country sits on the Pacific's earthquake and volcano belt, and is battered by an average of 20 typhoons a year.


Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+1 #1 Haberlandt 2011-03-21 16:36
Nice.
 
 
+4 #2 genetix 2011-03-21 17:13
Out of curiosity. What exactly happens when there's 2 million SMS messages on air for every device on ground while they send the messages. I mean if you are on highly crowded area your cellphone will not work signal is too weak. Wouldn't this same apply in this? (and cause an blockade to connectivity)
 
 
0 #3 hoohoo 2011-03-22 03:08
I was talking to a boffin last week about Japan. She told me of a guy who had proposed that gov'ts make use of a broadcast (in the eg IP broadcast sense) facility present in many cell networks to send alerts of tsunamis and the like.

An SMS approach is AFAIK one:one btwn telco and cellphone, thus a mass SMS alert could saturate a cellphone network. A broadcast would not.

I'm no cellphone expert, perhaps there is not broadcast facility in cellphone protocols... but if there is it would be the better way to go, no?
 

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