Featured Articles

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC’s next generation 16nm process has reached an important milestone – 16nm FinFET Plus (16FF+) is now in risk production.

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 24 March 2011 11:12

US wants to be the number one supercomputer again

Written by Nick Farell


Titan could top the charts
After losing the crown for the most powerful supercomputer in the world to China, the US is trying to get it back with a new project called Titan.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) campus in Oak Ridge Tennessee will host "Titan" which has been commissioned by the US Department of Energy, and is expected to achieve speeds of 20 petaflops per second.

Built by Cray Computer, it will become part of a collection of some of the fastest computers in the world at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory site. There are already Gaea, Kraken and the Jaguar super computers working from the site, Apparently plans are in the works for an entirely new facility to be built over the next year, which should fit in well with the delivery date for the first stage of the Titan expected to be by the end of this year, with the second stage expected next year.

Titan uses XT3, 4 and 5 processor boxes with a "Gemini" XE interconnect, and it will be configured in a 3D torus topology, rather than the usual array. It will use a GDU co-processor probably from Nvidia that will help to perform calculations more quickly. Titan will also use what is being described as “globally addressable memory,” which means data won’t have to slow down as it passes through I/O channels. It will set the government back to the tune of $100 million and will be used by the Department of Energy to calculate complex energy systems.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments