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Friday, 08 April 2011 10:51

Big Blue shows off fastest graphene transistor

Written by Nick Farell
ibm

55 billion cycles which is more than Bejing
IBM has been showing off its latest graphene transistor that can execute 155 billion cycles per second. It is about 50 percent faster than previous experimental transistors.

The new transistor has a cut-off frequency of 155GHz. The previous one could manage 100GHz  and it was shown off last year.

Top Big Blue boffin Yu-Ming Lin said that the research also shows that high-performance, graphene-based transistors can be produced at low cost using standard semiconductor manufacturing processes. In other words commercial production of graphene chips is not far away.

Graphene is a single-atom-thick layer of carbon atoms structured in a hexagonal honeycomb form. It could be used for high-performance RF (radio frequency) transistors.

Electrons move faster on graphene transistors than conventional transistors, which enables faster data transfers. Unfortunately they are not ideal for PCs yet, because they do not have the on-off ratio required for digital switching operations. But it is good at processing analog signals.


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+5 #1 Haberlandt 2011-04-08 16:37
Quote:
Top Big Blue boffin Yu-Ming Lin said that the research also shows that high-performance, graphene-based transistors can be produced at low cost using standard semiconductor manufacturing processes. In other words commercial production of graphene chips is not far away.
For real?! O.O
 
 
+15 #2 Super XP 2011-04-08 17:15
Boy for the past 25+ years, IBM has been inventing some serious technology advancements. Good on them and good for everybody. They have IMO the world’s best R&D department. Well, they are PC aren't they?
 
 
+9 #3 leftiszi 2011-04-08 21:35
Woah, imagine a Sandy Bridge or a Bulldozer at 155Ghz.
 
 
0 #4 Jermelescu 2011-04-10 00:54
Quoting leftiszi:
Woah, imagine a Sandy Bridge or a Bulldozer at 155Ghz.


What would be the use of it? We would need faster rams, hdds and gpus...
Though, I wonder how PC standards would be by 2020... :)
 
 
0 #5 Nerdmaster 2011-04-10 12:38
Did you read the article? There are many issues if you try to make a digital circuits with graphene.
 
 
0 #6 yourma2000 2011-04-10 15:36
We won't see Graphene transistors until silicon hits the brick wall at around 10nm-16nm, which will be somewhere around 2018, by then we will have done enough research into carbon transistors and will be ready for the transistion, this will be one of those defining years in tech
 
 
0 #7 FoxMontage 2011-04-11 13:42
Unfortunately, there is a huge difference between a 155GHz sine wave and a 155GHz digital signal (square wave). As the article states, the on-off ratio is poor, (it's terrible in fact) so you pretty much can't turn them off.

Only when the find a way to reliably open "band gap" will Graphene find a home in digital transistors.
 
 
-1 #8 fuadzilla 2011-04-11 19:30
who needs a graphene pc? quantum computing would be the buzzword then. heh.
 

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