Featured Articles

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple has finally unveiled its eagerly awaited smartwatch and surprisingly it has dropped the "i" from the brand, calling it simply…

More...
Skylake 14nm announced

Skylake 14nm announced

Kirk B. Skaugen, Senior Vice President General Manager, PC Client Group has showcased Skylake, Intel’s second generation 14nm architecture.

More...
Apple officially announces 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus

Apple officially announces 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus

The day has finally come and it appears that most rumors were actually spot on as Apple has now officially unveiled…

More...
CEO: Intel on target for 40m tablets

CEO: Intel on target for 40m tablets

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich just kicked off the IDF 2014 keynote and it started with a phone avatar, some Katy Perry…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 08 April 2011 11:24

Intel working on Atoms for servers

Written by Nick Farell
intel_atom_logo

Should be in the shops middle of next year
Boyd Davis, Intel's general manager of server marketing has said that versions of the Atom chip, which are dedicated to servers, should be in the shops in the middle of next year.

According to Zdnet Davis is travelling Europe in connection with the launch of the new top-end Xeon E7 series.
Davis said Intel had four architectures for the server market, including the Itanium processors developed with HP and now targeted mainly at Unix systems.

The Xeons go down to 20 Watts but we're not going to force customers who want to use Intel architecture to go somewhere else. While Intel does not have an Atom-based product, the space is unserved. The first cost-optimised server products will come from Intel.

He said  that 64-bit processing and ECC memory correction were "absolute requirements" and he expected this to give Intel an advantage.


Last modified on Friday, 08 April 2011 11:33
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments