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Friday, 08 April 2011 11:24

Intel working on Atoms for servers

Written by Nick Farell
intel_atom_logo

Should be in the shops middle of next year
Boyd Davis, Intel's general manager of server marketing has said that versions of the Atom chip, which are dedicated to servers, should be in the shops in the middle of next year.

According to Zdnet Davis is travelling Europe in connection with the launch of the new top-end Xeon E7 series.
Davis said Intel had four architectures for the server market, including the Itanium processors developed with HP and now targeted mainly at Unix systems.

The Xeons go down to 20 Watts but we're not going to force customers who want to use Intel architecture to go somewhere else. While Intel does not have an Atom-based product, the space is unserved. The first cost-optimised server products will come from Intel.

He said  that 64-bit processing and ECC memory correction were "absolute requirements" and he expected this to give Intel an advantage.


Last modified on Friday, 08 April 2011 11:33
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