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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 20 April 2011 09:56

Sandy Bridge E specs tip up online

Written by Fudzilla staff


Intel’s new flagship coming in Q4
According to a leaked roadmap, Intel’s flagship Sandy Bridge E series should appear in the fourth quarter and will feature quad- and six-core processors.

The as yet unnamed quad-core will feature a 3.6GHz clock and 10MB of cache, but it is not entirely unlocked, unlike the six-cores, which might limit overclocking to some extent.

The two six-cores will end up with 3.3GHz and 3.2GHz clocks, as well as 15MB and 12MB of cache respectively. Both will be fully unlocked.

The Sandy Bridge E series will continue to utilize the 32nm production process, but in the 22nm Ivy Bridge will begin to replace the quad-core Sandy parts.

You can check out the slides here.


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Comments  

 
+32 #1 fingerbob69 2011-04-20 10:48
If so inclined I could change my cpu 4 times in 2 years inorder to stay bleenin' edge... I'm just not that rich!
 
 
+45 #2 nele 2011-04-20 10:54
Quoting fingerbob69:
If so inclined I could change my cpu 4 times in 2 years inorder to stay bleenin' edge... I'm just not that rich!


Hey this is Intel we're talking about.

If you were to change four CPUs, you would probably have to change four motherboards and sockets as well. :lol:
 
 
+23 #3 NickThePrick 2011-04-20 11:25
I think my old 6850 still did a fine job. Lol.
Its really a shame how little effort is been put in by most developers to utilize those CPUs to their full capabilities.
I just made a switch from my old 6850 as mentioned to a AMD T1090 and now a Intel i7 2600k. Hardly notice a difference in most applications. Its really the software that's lagging behind.
 
 
-34 #4 Drac 2011-04-20 11:27
Quoting nele:
Hey this is Intel we're talking about.

If you were to change four CPUs, you would probably have to change four motherboards and sockets as well. :lol:


As much as i like sarcasm,you failed with this one completely.
All Sandy and Ivy will use one socket - 1155.Of course,you still can change 4 mobos,since Intel at least giving they customers option to choose from many boards and chipsets.H67,P67,Z68,upc oming 7 series.
In other hand - if you have current Sandy,no point to change to those future cpus,you wont gain big performance.And knowing that amd Shovel (aka bullllldozer) wont even fight with Sandy,it makes current Sandy cpus even more nicier :D
Sarcasm off :D
 
 
+8 #5 Naterm 2011-04-20 11:31
Uh, not all Sandy and Ivy Bridge processors use the same socket. They're split over two sockets, LGA1155 and LGA2011. I was seriously hoping for eight cores, I could use eight cores in a single socket setup. Looks like I'll have to go Xeon to get that.

I don't see what the big deal with changing motherboards is. It's a fact of life. LGA1366 is three years old, going to another socket on the high-end should be absolutely no surprise.

LGA1156 was definitely too short lived, but everyone knew that it would be before it even launched. Don't whine about things that you should have been aware of going in.
 
 
+6 #6 loadwick 2011-04-20 12:56
I am amazed there is not an 8-core Extreme Edition and then the others are 6-core.

I don't see what is going to make them so much faster than the current Sandy Bridge set up that will make the massive price difference. Especially if overclocking is limited!

From what i can see the expensive high-end versions have more cache and more memory channels, neither will set the benchmarks alight.

plus they are going to be closely followed by 22nm Ivy Bridge which will probably end up faster.

What a waste of time and money!
 
 
+9 #7 TechHog 2011-04-20 13:54
Quoting Drac:
As much as i like sarcasm,you failed with this one completely.
All Sandy and Ivy will use one socket - 1155.Of course,you still can change 4 mobos,since Intel at least giving they customers option to choose from many boards and chipsets.H67,P67,Z68,upc oming 7 series.
In other hand - if you have current Sandy,no point to change to those future cpus,you wont gain big performance.And knowing that amd Shovel (aka bullllldozer) wont even fight with Sandy,it makes current Sandy cpus even more nicier :D
Sarcasm off :D

You mad, brah?
 
 
+4 #8 Exodite 2011-04-20 14:53
The question is, will S2011 be the new S1366 in every way?

That's to say vastly more expensive than the mainstream platform while offering no real advantage.

Cue i7 930 vs. i5 760 comparisons.

Let's hope S2011 gets a 22nm refresh when Ivy Bridge comes around, if not it's as pointless as its predecessor.
 
 
+5 #9 Boomstick777 2011-04-20 15:03
Does this mean no 6 or 8 core on 1155 p67? Im happy with my 2600k for now, 4.6ghz at 1.32 volts. Performance is overkill tbh.

Next year I would of liked to have been able to upgrade to an 8 core Ivybridge (purely for epeen) on my same p67 1155 B3 motherboard, will be a shame if Intel don't release more than 4 core on 1155?
 
 
+5 #10 TechHog 2011-04-20 15:14
BUT BUT BUT

Six cores! D:
 

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