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Thursday, 05 May 2011 08:53

Cooler Master NotePal LapAir tested - 3. A closer look at LapAir

Written by Sanjin Rados

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Review: Because your lap(top) deserves it

As you can see, LapAir is designed to comfortably sit on your knees and angle your laptop while it’s at it.

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Thanks to clever design, airflow will not be blocked when you’re working on your knees or couch. The device uses an 8cm fan that’s placed center-top.


aCM_LapAir_1_

The fan has a mesh grill cover that can be taken off and cleaned.

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LapAir is angled for two reasons – your posture while working and optimum air-circulation.

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Bottom of the LapAir has soft mat surface and your knees will surely appreciate it.

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However, soft matte is pretty slippery so Cooler Master put a thick rubber strip on the other side to stop LapAir from moving.

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The fan is powered via USB cable, which is physically connected to the fan. The USB tip is a pass-through connector, meaning you still get to use the port for something else.

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You can route the cable via channels (above) to where you have a free USB on your laptop.

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(Page 3 of 4)
Last modified on Thursday, 05 May 2011 09:33
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