Featured Articles

Analyst reveals Apple Watch spec

Analyst reveals Apple Watch spec

An analyst has examined the Apple Watch supply chain in an effort to ascertain the exact spec of Cupertino’s new gadget…

More...
Nvidia's first 20nm product is a mobile SoC

Nvidia's first 20nm product is a mobile SoC

For much of the year we were under the impression that the second generation Maxwell will end up as a 20nm…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

It appears that Nvidia has been feeling the pulse of the market and took some note from comments regarding the original…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 05 May 2011 11:23

Intel redesigns the transistor

Written by Nick Farell


Gives AMD pause for thought
Intel might have placed itself three years ahead of AMD after redesigning the transistor. Yesterday Intel announced that it was bringing in 3D transistors which will let them design smaller and more powerful processors.

Tri-gate designs use a 22-nanometre process with a "fin" jutting up from the base. Chips using them will go into production this year and appear in computers in 2012 in processors codenamed "Ivy Bridge". The new designs will also use less power. A dual-core chip with 22nm tri-gate transistors would use the same power as an existing 32nm chip. The move could get Intel into smartphones and tablet computers, which is dominated by low powered designs from ARM.

Intel said that its new chips would be "extremely competitive" with ARM on power consumption. It has not provided any figures or a date when the chips would appear in smartphones. Intel has been talking about 3D transistors for nearly a decade.  No-one has been able to make them in any numbers. However analysts called it one of the most significant shifts in silicon transistor design since the integrated circuit was invented in the 1950s. The belief is that it the design should allow it to advance at least a generation ahead of its rivals.
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments