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Tuesday, 10 May 2011 10:09

Charity unveils $25 ARM-based computer

Written by Fudzilla staff


Even the Greek government could afford a couple
British charity Raspberry Pi Foundation has unveiled a dirt cheap computer based on the ARM architecture aimed at school users.

The tiny contraption costs a mere $25 and it is about the size of an oversized USB stick. The device is powered by an ARM11 processor at 700MHz, it has 128MB of memory, 1080p support via HDMI, USB 2.0 port and a memory card reader for storage.

The Raspberry Pi can run open software, such as Ubuntu, Iceweasel, Python and KOffice.

Fudzilla staff

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+8 #1 Kryojenix 2011-05-10 11:25
Brilliant!
Sometimes I feel the OLPC project was a lot of huff a bit too early, I suppose they may have expected to contribute to the cost-lowering of general computer tech over time, but in the end it came from netbooks and more pertinently for the future - from mobile phones. And open-source Linux - very important factor too.

Also, I could never stomach the OLPC insistence that each kid must have their own laptop as if a shared resource must always become an undervalued one. But when it comes to adapted mobile tech., it does make more sense for each kid (or adult) to have their own.

The future will be interesting, as long as we can share and learn to recycle rare earth minerals and prevent mobile computers from becoming the new blood diamonds...
 
 
+1 #2 123s 2011-05-10 11:32
I like the idea a lot, though atm its bit weak and could use more usb hubs...ofc its not surprising with the price and size.
 
 
+7 #3 nele 2011-05-10 11:41
Here's the catch - it's HDMI only.

So... schools would need relatively new monitors/TVs to use something like this and I doubt many schools in the third world or less affluent countries have any.

Otherwise it's an interesting concept, just slap on a couple of extra USBs and that's it. It would be interesting to offer a consumer version, something a bit bigger with a VESA mount to slap on the back of TVs, just to offer rudimentary web access and media playback at a faction of the cost of an HTPC or even standalone media players.
 
 
+2 #4 The blue fox 2011-05-10 12:00
This device would be much more useful if were to have a built in screen and KB. like the OQO. In this way it can be used when a screen KB and mouse are not available.
 
 
+1 #5 NickThePrick 2011-05-10 12:04
Quoting The blue fox:
This device would be much more useful if were to have a built in screen and KB. like the OQO. In this way it can be used when a screen KB and mouse are not available.



Might as well call it a netbook then....
 
 
+1 #6 The blue fox 2011-05-10 12:32
Quoting NickThePrick:
Might as well call it a netbook then....

True. But as the device stands now you will simply have every one fighting over the display device so they can use there little computer.
And if these were going to be given to kids. Would it not be nice for them to be-able to use them in class.
 
 
+3 #7 Reavenk 2011-05-10 14:30
Neat. I can't wait to see the low priced devices that come from this.
 
 
+4 #8 gamoniac 2011-05-10 14:37
[quote name="Kryojenix"]
Also, I could never stomach the OLPC insistence that each kid must have their own laptop as if a shared resource must always become an undervalued one...quote]

I agree with you. Coming from a 3rd world country myself, there are other ways to learn than making all the kids in under-previleged nations carry a computer like in Western nations. There is nothing wrong with 5 students sharing a PC. Although with good intent, OLPC is imposing their values and assumed needs on nations with much less means.

Anyway, $25 ARM PC is simply quite amazing. How do they do it with such low costs?
 
 
0 #9 hoohoo 2011-05-10 23:35
Quoting Kryojenix:
Brilliant!
Sometimes I feel the OLPC project was a lot of huff a bit too early, ...


Keep in mind that the primary purpose of OLPC was to promote Negreponte and advertise his lab.
 
 
-2 #10 loadwick 2011-05-11 00:04
Is no one else worried that if we don't have child povety then they might go to school rather than work in the sweat shops for almost nothing a day so that we can enjoy cheaper prices in the west.
I mean the iPhone is expensive enough as it is so we don't want Apple to have to employ adults at a higher salary as we all know who will pick the bill up for that don't we.
 

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