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Wednesday, 11 May 2011 09:16

Quad Core Sandy Bridge E starts at 3.6 GHz

Written by Fuad Abazovic
intel_logo_new

Fastest clocked Intel so far
Intel simply doesn’t want to go over the 4GHz mark, not even with its Sandy Bridge E upcoming high performance CPUs. The six core version clocked at 3.3GHz can natively get to 3.9GHz with turbo overclocking and it looks like the four core version shares the same fate.

The main difference is that the quad core Sandy Bridge E comes with a native clock of quite high 3.6GHz, the fastest we've seen so far and a single core can get to 3.9GHz with a little turbo automatic overclocking assistance.

The quad core Sandy Bridge E has eight tread support, works with 1066 and 1333DDR3 memory and has the expected 130W TDP. Let’s not forget the four way memory support, again a first for Intel's high end products. Sandy Bridge E quad core is still a 32nm product.

We are pretty sure that overclockers will exceed 4GHz with ease and overclockers are indeed the target audience. Naturally, they'll need to reach deep inot their pocket as Enthusiast class CPUs from Intel usually cost an arm and leg.

A very important detail - Sandy Bridge E has no integrated graphics like the rest of Sandy Bridge family.


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Comments  

 
-13 #1 eugen 2011-05-11 09:42
4ghz 130wtdp this is not the future i was hoping for for 20 yrs fast means higher frequency and more transistors and redesigning it`s like digging a hole with a rubber shovel
 
 
+53 #2 Bignon 2011-05-11 09:42
Quote:
A very important detail - Sandy Bridge E has no integrated graphics like the rest of Sandy Bridge family.


I think that's a good thing because no one who buys this kind of CPU will use the integrated slide projector Intel calls graphic solution :P.
 
 
0 #3 Exodite 2011-05-11 13:01
Quoting Bignon:
I think that's a good thing because no one who buys this kind of CPU will use the integrated slide projector Intel calls graphic solution :P.



That depends entirely upon your workload, doesn't it?

Home enthusiasts using the platform are likely gamers so in that regard you're no doubt right. A lot of professional work don't require more GPU horsepower than what's required to power the screen, however.

Heck, I almost never have any actual use for my own Radeon HD6950 - I spend a good 95+% of the time writing code, tro^H^H^H surfing the web and watching movies.

All of which would work perfectly fine on the iGPU of my SNB system.
 
 
+7 #4 Bl0bb3r 2011-05-11 13:12
Actually Exodite, Bignon's right... the GPU in Sandy is just a support solution for those that think it's enough.

As to what you have said next I have to disagree. While you are an expert in one field, it's not a field that needs high CPU processing power. Writing code doesn't need Sandy-E CPU's... you can do that just as well on lower TDP like i3's. But those pro's that will need that power will most likely also go with Quadro or FirePro and specialized compute applications.

Sandy Bridge E series is for ultra enthusiasts with deep pockets... the platform will use LGA 2011 and will most likely be targeted for Quad-SLI/Quad-XFire users.
 
 
+2 #5 eugen 2011-05-11 18:06
horsepower/horseshit a lot tdp heat dissipation smells like an improved 1366 to me with of course higher stock frequency and 3dshit anyway this progress stink`s a lot ,hope i`m wrong and well see more than 10% improvement over the old 920..
 
 
+2 #6 Exodite 2011-05-11 18:23
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
Writing code doesn't need Sandy-E CPU's...



By that reasoning nothing needs high-performance hardware. You can play games on a tablet, or do renders on a netbook.

In my case, compile software - which incidentally makes good use of HT/SMT.

SNB-E will definitely cater to enthusiasts but it'll also be a good choice for those who choose 970s or 980/990s over 2500K/2600K even today. That's to say the kind of people who need all the CPU power they can get.

A blatantly obvious, though somewhat disingenuous, example would be servers, something the current S1366 also caters to.
 
 
+2 #7 TechHog 2011-05-11 23:11
Quoting Bignon:
Quote:
A very important detail - Sandy Bridge E has no integrated graphics like the rest of Sandy Bridge family.


I think that's a good thing because no one who buys this kind of CPU will use the integrated slide projector Intel calls graphic solution :P.

Unless you want to use Quick Sync, that is...
 
 
+1 #8 Bad-Karma 2011-05-12 03:35
Quote:
Let’s not forget the four way memory support,


Please tell me that's a reference to quad channel DDR3 (8 slots). I'd hate to give up having 6 DDR3 slots

Faud - a little more info on this of you could...
 
 
+3 #9 Bl0bb3r 2011-05-12 08:58
Quoting Exodite:
By that reasoning nothing *snip*



The reasoning is right, you just have a problem accepting it. Typing text, what you will do 99% doesn't need Sandy-E. Period. And SMT is available on other CPU's as well, no point in dragging this into the discussion.

And the crap you said about gaming has nothing to do with this, by that reasoning why should anyone play high-end games that need a lot of power when tablets are fine, although just for crappy games.
 

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