Featured Articles

Intel takes credit for three-way 4K gaming

Intel takes credit for three-way 4K gaming

All of a sudden Intel is talking about desktop gaming like there is no tomorrow and it is pushing it. The…

More...
Nvidia Shield Tablet 32GB 4G LTE out for pre orders

Nvidia Shield Tablet 32GB 4G LTE out for pre orders

Nvidia has finally revealed the shipping date of its Shield Tablet 32GB in 4G LTE flavour and in case you pre-order…

More...
Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple has finally unveiled its eagerly awaited smartwatch and surprisingly it has dropped the "i" from the brand, calling it simply…

More...
Skylake 14nm announced

Skylake 14nm announced

Kirk B. Skaugen, Senior Vice President General Manager, PC Client Group has showcased Skylake, Intel’s second generation 14nm architecture.

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 17 May 2011 13:58

Swiss and German boffins want to built a brain

Written by Nick Farell
y_globe

Computer modelling
Boffins from Switzerland and Germany are to build a computer model of a human brain, dubbed the Human Brain Project. The team is trying to get a £1billion grant and claim that if they succeed in building a brain on a computer they could find cures for various diseases like Parkinson's.

Henry Markram, director of the Human Brain Project in Switzerland claims that the project could lead to intelligent robots and supercomputers which would dwarf those currently in existence. Markram is a neuroscientist at the École Polytechnique Fédérale in Lausanne, Switzerland. He said that humanity needs to understand what makes us human.’ He thinks that if they secure the funding, they will be able to replicate mankind's most vital organ in 12 years.

It would mean that drug companies could dramatically shorten testing times by bypassing humans to test new medicaments on the computer model. Supercomputers at the Jülich Research Center near Cologne are earmarked to play a vital role in the research which Makram says will involve ‘a tsunami of data.’


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments