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Monday, 06 June 2011 12:28

Music album that knows where you live

Written by Nick Farell
y_globe

Technology goes bonker
In the good old days you used to plonk on a nice record and listen to it. However these days the record labels are looking at more ways to make the experience about as interactive as possible without you having to play an instrument.

The latest is to make the album site-specific and it has been put out by an outfit called Bluebrain. The National Mall album is delivered in the form of an iPhone app and it uses the iPhone's built-in GPS capabilities to create sound permutations as the listener moves around a stretch of park in downtown Washington DC called the Mall.

Zones within the Mall are tagged and alter the sound based on where the listener is located in proximity to them. Zones overlap and interact in dynamic ways that, while far from random, will yield a unique experience with each listen. The proprietary design that is the engine behind the app will stay hidden from view as the melodies, rhythms, instrumentation and pace of the music vary based on the listeners’ chosen path, the press release tells us.

Since it is an iPhone App, music taste is not that important. Still it does create some interesting ideas to associate music with places. Handel's Water Music when you enter a toilet for example.

List your ideas below:


Nick Farell

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