Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC’s next generation 16nm process has reached an important milestone – 16nm FinFET Plus (16FF+) is now in risk production.

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 23 June 2011 07:55

Vendors said to be working on ARM/Android notebooks

Written by


When flopping in the tablet market just isn’t enough
Several major vendors, including Acer, Toshiba, Asus and Samsung, are reportedly planning to introduce ARM-based notebooks.

The ARM-books will use Android and there’s even a chance they will show up by the end of the year. It all reminds us of the smartbook concept, which amounted to nothing two years ago. However, this time around vendors at least have a proper OS to go with the hardware, and the hardware itself has evolved to include dual-core processors at higher clocks. With quad-core ARMs entering the fray shortly, vendors might have a bit more luck.

The advantages of using ARM processors in ultraportable notebooks are obvious. They could deliver much better battery life and allow vendors to design very thin, passively cooled devices. The downside is equally obvious, no x86 and no Windows support, at least not yet.

More here.
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments