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Thursday, 23 June 2011 09:07

Dutch accidentally spike neutrality

Written by Nick Farell
y_globe

Labor Party gives it a huge loophole
The Dutch, who were set to have a really interesting Net Neutrality Law, appear to have stuffed it up by giving ISPs a loophole.

A proposal  to ensure net neutrality by squeezing, pricing or blocking of Internet ban was adopted. But an exception to the law was also accidentally passed and backed by the Labor Party who clearly thought they were voting for more beer for MPs.

The exception allowed for SGP / CDA Internet filters on the basis of ideological motives. The Labour Party wanted to correct this mistake, but was told it was impossible. The VVD party also voted for the amendment making it a majority.

The proposal allows an ISP to block some websites under fairly unusual circumstances so it is not likely to cause too much trouble. However the error cannot be repaired. The only way to stop the amendment is to ask it to be changed in the Senate.


Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+7 #1 SlickR 2011-06-23 11:31
Why do governments want to control the internet and whats on it?

Get lost and let the internet be free from your corrupt ways.
 
 
+16 #2 fingerbob69 2011-06-23 11:49
[quote name="SlickR"]Why do governments want to control the internet and whats on it? quote]

Ask the ex-governments of Tunisia and Egypt that question. Ask the soon to be ex governments of Syria and Libya how much the'd like to be able to control what's on the net ...you know, all those pesky videos on Youtube of unarmed protestors being gunned down by government security forces.

Information is power. But if you have the power to distribute information, the sort labelled inconvenient truths, freely and to the detriment of the government of the day then you have the power to change governments... to become the government
 
 
-5 #3 Zone 2011-06-23 13:06
Quoting fingerbob69:
[quote name="SlickR"]Why do governments want to control the internet and whats on it? quote]

Ask the ex-governments of Tunisia and Egypt that question. Ask the soon to be ex governments of Syria and Libya how much the'd like to be able to control what's on the net ...you know, all those pesky videos on Youtube of unarmed protestors being gunned down by government security forces.

Information is power. But if you have the power to distribute information, the sort labelled inconvenient truths, freely and to the detriment of the government of the day then you have the power to change governments... to become the government



That indeed is the case for those countries, but for a Western country this makes no sense.
 
 
+7 #4 fingerbob69 2011-06-23 14:36
[quote name="Zone
That indeed is the case for those countries, but for a Western country this makes no sense.

Oh really? Have you seen the 'street parties' currently being held in Greece at the moment? There have been similar in Spain.

Such popular discontent (fed by and organised on the net ...a net which has made the organising and channelling of said discontent so much easier and virtually instantaneous) is the seed core of revolution. Western governments fear it just as much as middle east dictators.
 
 
0 #5 Zone 2011-06-24 09:35
Quoting fingerbob69:
Oh really? Have you seen the 'street parties' currently being held in Greece at the moment? There have been similar in Spain.

Such popular discontent (fed by and organised on the net ...a net which has made the organising and channelling of said discontent so much easier and virtually instantaneous) is the seed core of revolution. Western governments fear it just as much as middle east dictators.


Really now?
So you are saying that a nation on the verge of bankruptcy would not have his citizens protesting if it was not for the internet?
You do realize the internet has not been around for long right?
 
 
0 #6 youserzero 2011-06-25 01:25
Quoting Zone:
Really now?
So you are saying that a nation on the verge of bankruptcy would not have his citizens protesting if it was not for the internet?
You do realize the internet has not been around for long right?


Giving a group of protesters a communication network makes them operate and react much more efficiently and quickly.

Just imagine if the US military no longer had any communication networks.....they would be no where near as effective if not totally useless.
 

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