Featured Articles

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel has revealed an update to its CPU roadmap and some things have changed in 2015 and beyond. Let’s start with the…

More...
Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 04 July 2011 13:24

AMD might be regretting getting rid of Dirk

Written by Nick Farell


Six months on it has not found someone better
After six months AMD still has not found someone to replace Dirk Meyer as CEO. Meyer quit because the board did not like his answer to tablets and mobiles, which suggested that it was just another Apple fad and would blow away.

But the problem is that AMD is doing rather well at the moment, not because of anything it has done in the last six months, but because of what Meyer was doing before he left. The company, which has substantial operations in Austin, has introduced two new families of PC processors in the first half of the year, Brazos and Llano, and both have been well received by PC makers. Things are starting to look like AMD's share of the PC market might climb to 25 percent or so over the next several quarters.

Meyer's believed that AMD should be targeting Intel over the PC processor market and ignore the tablet and smartphone thing. It is starting to look like he was right. Companies that have been investing large amounts of cash in tablets have lost it. In other words, the plans and programs put in place by Meyer and his team are just starting to pay off. But AMD stock is too cheap. You can pick a share up for $7 and most of that is because the outfit has not found a CEO. Part of the problem is that they want a Meyer who agrees with them about tablets and knows about them. There are few that fit that bill.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments