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Monday, 04 July 2011 14:51

Wi-Lan buries the hatchet with Texas Instruments

Written by Nick Farell
texas_instruments

TI writes a cheque
Canadian patent licensing outfit Wi-LAN has settled a patent dispute related to Bluetooth technology with chipmaker Texas Instruments. Wi-LAN holds more than 525 wireless technology patents, did not disclose terms of the agreement, including the how many zeros TI had to put on the final cheque.

The outfit has been doing quite well lately.  In February, Wi-LAN  agreed to end all litigation with British chipmaker CSR out of court and has  signed license deals with a host of companies, including Intel, Apple, Dell and HP.

Indeed it seems there is more money to be made in patent deals then there is making actual products. At this rate you can't invent something new without stepping on someone's patent. Normally it goes to court, gets expensive and someone has to write a cheque to make someone else's laywers go away.


Nick Farell

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