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Monday, 18 July 2011 11:35

IE9 ranks best in malware-blocking

Written by
ie

IE9 ranks best in malware-blocking

According to the latest report fresh out of NSS Labs, Redmond’s Internet Explorer 9 is king of the hill in terms of security.

 

The insecurity outfit found that IE9 managed to block 92 percent of malware with URL-based filtering and a whopping 100 percent with application-based filtering. The previous version, IE8 ranked second with a 90 percent blockage rate.

On the other hand, the competition has nothing to brag about. Safari 5, Chrome 10 and Firefox 4 were tied for third place and managed to block just 13 percent of malware traffic. Opera 11 managed just 5 percent.


The reason behind equally disappointing figures for Safari, Chrome and Mozilla browsers lies in the fact that they all use the same URL blacklisting date listed in Google’s Safe Browsing System, which should probably be renamed to Google Unsafe Browsing System.

More here.

Last modified on Monday, 18 July 2011 11:39

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