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Monday, 18 July 2011 12:34

First Sandy Bridge-E models detailed

Written by Slobodan Simic
corei7extn_logo

One quad- and two hexa-cores

The guys from Donanimhaber.com managed to score some details regarding first three Sandy Bridge-E models, the Core i7-3960X, Core i7-3930X and the Core i7-3820.

The first one, Core i7-3960X will feature six cores clocked at 3.30GHz with Turbo set at 3.9GHz. It will have 15MB of cache and since this one bears Intel's Extreme Edition badge, the multiplier will be unlocked.
The second one, Core i7-3930 is also part of the Extreme Edition lineup and will also have an unlocked multiplier. This hexa-core works at 3.2GHz with Turbo set at 3.8GHz. It has 12MB of cache while the TDP should be rated at 130W, same as the Core i7-3960X.

The final one detailed is the non-EE quad-core Core i7-3820. Clocked at 3.6GHz (Turbo at 3.9GHz) this one will not feature unlocked multiplier, will have 10MB of cache and should have the same 130W TDP. According to the same post, all three models should feature support for quad-channel memory.

You can find more here.

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Comments  

 
+1 #1 maroon1 2011-07-18 15:44
Actually, Core i7-3820 is going to have partially unlocked multi

It is going to have 6 bins above the highest Turbo
 
 
+1 #2 Cartman 2011-07-19 00:01
And they will cost two arms as always with Intel EE :)
 
 
+1 #3 milkod2001 2011-07-19 09:05
Quoting Cartman:
And they will cost two arms as always with Intel EE :)
the chepeast one should go under 400 bucks,that's not bad at all.Question is:how much mobo will cost and would it be that much better than 2600k?And it comes next year,same as IvyBridge CPUs, is there a point to release Sandy Bridge-E at all?
 
 
+4 #4 Skynet 2011-07-19 12:34
What a massive let down!

Sandy Bridge's arch is old now so if Intel want people to get excited and spend big bucks on old tech then it needs to be special, and hex-core is not that! All the SB-E should have all been 8-core and just differentiated by speeds and cache sizes.

The i7-3820 is a joke!
How is a locked quad core at 3.9GHz max going to beat the 2500k/2600k that are far far cheaper and can be clocked closer to 5GHz? Quad-memory won't do sh1t and 10mb cache will only help a little in certain applications.

Intel have really messed up this round IMO. SB-E should have been out before SB, only then do you bring out the cheaper models.

I just wish i bought the 2500k on launch day!
 
 
+1 #5 bardenck 2011-07-19 16:18
Quoting Skynet:
What a massive let down!

Sandy Bridge arch is old so if Intel want people to get excited and spend big bucks on old tech then it needs to be special and hex-core is not that. They should have all been 8-core and just different speeds and cache amounts.

The i7-3820 is a joke! How is a quad core at a max of 3.9GHz going to beat the 2500k/2600k that are far far cheaper and can be clocked close to 5GHz? Quad-memory won't to sh1t and 10mb cache will only help so much and only in certain applications.

The smart money would be wait for 22nm Ivy Bridge version of the 2500k, or maybe even Bulldozer.



i agree so far about the 3820 but SB is old?
 
 
+4 #6 Skynet 2011-07-19 20:18
@ bardenck

I just feel that the high end should be cutting edge, after all you are paying a massive premium for it. But the way that Intel has done its high end this time just seems cheap.

They should have released Sandy Bridge high end first so that the massive premium that you pay for owning the high end was worth it. I just can't see these chips being that much better than regular SB, not clock for clock, core for core.

time will tell i guess and i am not saying they won't be fast but i think with great chips like 2500k and possibly bulldozer too then SB-e is going to struggle to delivery bang per buck like the 1366 i7 920 did.
 
 
+1 #7 bardenck 2011-07-19 20:24
Quoting Skynet:
@ bardenck

I just feel that the high end should be cutting edge, after all you are paying a massive premium for it. But the way that Intel has done its high end this time just seems cheap.

They should have released Sandy Bridge high end first so that the massive premium that you pay for owning the high end was worth it. I just can't see these chips being that much better than regular SB, not clock for clock, core for core.

time will tell i guess and i am not saying they won't be fast but i think with great chips like 2500k and possibly bulldozer too then SB-e is going to struggle to delivery bang per buck like the 1366 i7 920 did.


understood.agreed.
 

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