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Thursday, 21 July 2011 12:03

Intel boss has high hopes for Ultrabooks

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Could be the new Centrino
Intel CEO Paul Otellini is busy spreading the ultrabook gospel to faithful investors. On the back of another record quarter, Otellini said the ultrabook concept would be the next big thing in the notebook market.

Speaking in a conference call, Otellini said that Intel’s earlier attempt to crack the ultrathin notebook market with CULV processors was a “kind of a trial run” for ultrabooks. He argued that Intel will use an entirely different strategy with ultrabooks and work closely with partners to develop top notch products.

"The ultrabook project is much more akin to Centrino," he said. "It's a very wholistic approach to moving the entire market to a different kind of form factor.”

However, there are some downsides to Intel’s platform-oriented approach. Intel is apparently insisting on using pricey components in an effort to create premium products and ultrabooks are expected to cost up to $999. Taiwanese vendors have already voiced concern about Intel’s strategy. They fear high production costs could result in low margins and slow demand, hence Intel is offering subsidies to some vendors who take up the concept.

More here.

 

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0 #1 chyll2 2011-07-21 14:21
Quote:
They fear high production costs could result in low margins and slow demand, hence Intel is offering subsidies to some vendors who take up the concept.

why not just sell it to all vendor at a cheaper price.

Intel really likes to give "subsidies".
 
 
0 #2 redunion1940 2011-07-21 22:05
So its going to give subsidies probably to companies that delay or stop similar AMD releases.

Or.. This is still abuse of monopoly, Giving reduced prices to some and not all when you are for all intents and purposes a monopoly is abuse.

Microsoft learned this back between 1998 and 2001.
 
 
0 #3 unknown555525 2011-07-22 06:55
Here's the problem though intel, these days it's all about the visual. You can't just jam in an ultra fast low power CPU and seal the deal, you NEED a good graphics solution to go along with it. You can't really "wow" people with just brute force processing power in a small package, it has to be a complete high end system. Intel doesn't really have what it takes at this time to do that, so unless these ultrabooks are made in conjunction with nVidia or AMD, they really aren't any more attractive than your average netbook in my eyes.
 

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