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Friday, 29 July 2011 08:52

MX vs. ATV Alive experiment failed

Written by David Stellmack
thq_logo

Cheap title & forcing users into DLC not the answer
MX vs. ATV Alive release from THQ was an experiment to see if a new revenue generating model might be something that consumers would embrace. The concept that THQ tried was to sell the title cheap, in this case $39.99, and then put a massive focus on DLC purchases to let the buyer customize and add just the parts that were wanted for the game by purchasing them.

While the idea might have sounded good on paper, according to THQ the entire concept did not resonate well with consumers; many were resentful and claimed they were cheated from getting the full game, as what they got was pretty bare bones.  Other complaints were also that consumers felt forced by the company to purchase DLC to get parts of the game that seemed to be left out.

While the reviews of the game were not very stellar (to say the least), the game did apparently have an initial sales surge because of the low price, but the sales model just didn’t work because of the high costs involved with the DLC. THQ admits, however, that they will continue to explore the concept, but right now have no plans to reintroduce it with another title in the immediate future.


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