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Wednesday, 03 August 2011 10:46

‘Gold Traders’ company behind spoof cat exchange website

Written by Nick Farell
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2,085 people tried to swap their old gold for cats
One of the UK’s leading gold exchange websites has revealed that it is the company behind the spoof website Cats4Gold.com, where customers could seemingly exchange their old gold for a brand new cat.

It would seem that the 2,085 people who attempted to exchange their gold for cats will be disappointed, as the company admitted they are the ones behind the spoof website. The idea behind Cats4Gold.com came after the founders of Gold Traders saw the marketplace had become exceedingly crowded, with companies spending huge sums of money on advertising and promising customers ‘top prices’ for their gold. 

These expensive advertising campaigns resulted in low payouts for customers, with the main companies paying as little as 20 per cent of the market value for unwanted gold. At those rip off prices, they would be better off with a cat.

Nick Farell

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