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Wednesday, 10 August 2011 10:11

Intel not very competitive in tablet and phone markets

Written by Fuad Abazovic
intel_atom_logo

Industry insiders think

Chaps close to ARM have spawned an interesting thought about Intel's tablet and phone chips. Industry seniors, who want to remain unnamed, said that they need to see Intel shipping more of its chips before they start taking Intel's competition much more seriously.

It takes a lot of effort from demo chip to production and the part where you are supposed to see the design win, based on your actual chip shipping. This part takes many quarters.

Intel is undoubtedly getting better at this game and it has a chance to be the first company to make 22nm mobile and tablet chip, but it still has idle power issues to take care. Its 32nm Atom Z670 is not much of a competitor to current dual core ARM based chips, not to mention that quad core ARM chips are just around the corner.

The same sources reminded us that a few years back it was expected that Symbian can take some 60 percent of market by 2014, and from today’s stand point, Symbian will be almost completely gone by that time.

As of today Intel still has a lot to learn, but judging by some recent hiring, they do have a winning chance in this lucrative market. The fight for the ARM market is between Qualcomm, Nvidia and Texas Instruments, for the most part, and of course Apple will continue to make a lot of Ax chips for its devices.

Last modified on Wednesday, 10 August 2011 10:21
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