Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 13 September 2011 10:42

British can't come up with new ideas

Written by Nick Farell
y_exclamation

Cutting back too much on research
If you wonder why there has been a lack of brilliant ideas coming out of Britain lately it might be because the nation's businesses are cutting back on research.

A third of British companies spend nothing on searching for new ideas, services and products according to a new survey conducted by IT consultancy Portal. The survey of 500 companies up and down the country found that only a fifth of companies spend more than five per cent of their revenues on research and development (R&D), despite the fact that nearly 52 percent recognise that innovation is critical.

In a whitepaper entitled “Innovation: the first casualty of a downturn”, the companies said that the economic downturn is the main reason for failing to invest in R&D. Less than seven per cent of respondents have increased their investment since the start of the recession in 2008 while nearly 14 per cent have “cut their investment in R&D enormously.” More than 48 per cent said they would invest more if the government was able to offer tax breaks on R&D expenditure.

Lack of available funds is not the only reason for companies failing to invest sufficiently. Perceived difficulty of the process is deterring some from applying sufficient resource too.



Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
0 #1 Squall_Leonhart 2011-09-15 21:33
stupid british, the one thing to stimulate an economy is ideas!
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments