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Wednesday, 21 September 2011 10:11

China and Russia propose UN internet code of conduct

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Beacons of freedom they are not
The governments of China, Russia, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan have drafted an internet code of conduct and they introduced it at the UN General Assembly a couple of days ago. No seriously, they have, here it is.

The voluntary code of conduct demands countries show respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, and where better to turn to for “human rights and fundamental freedoms” than these Eurasian beacons of freedom. The code also states that signatories would not carry out hostile activities or acts of aggression via internet tools.

Governments also pledge to curb dissemination of information inciting terrorism, secessionism and other activities that undermine political, economic and social stability. From now on we guess you will have to get your biased reporting and inflammatory rhetoric from Russia Today rather then the internet.

Of course, the proposal has next to no chances of ever being seriously considered by other UN member states, as it would allow governments to censor whatever they deem is a threat to “political, economic and social stability” – things like, oh I don’t know, free speech for example?

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0 #1 Squall_Leonhart 2011-09-23 05:53
INVADE CHINA
 

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