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Tuesday, 27 September 2011 09:34

Intel breaks consumer notebooks in five categories

Written by Fuad Abazovic


Ultrabook not mentioned
It was interesting to notice that Intel has decided to paint a different picture of consumer market presentation. It used to talk clock speeds and specifications, but as of recently they have decided to make things more simple.

Intel now divides consumer notebooks in basic, entertainment, on the go, gaming and content creation as the most expensive pillar.

Basic is the cheapest market segment and should start just under $300 and offer some basic internet, email, video viewing and light productivity. We’ve seen a few machines for this price, but it usually rarely comes with Windows for this price. The more expensive ones should cost up to $600 in this market segment.

Entertainment is the next segment, obviously slightly more expensive than basic and it promises good media experience, nice casual gaming performance and a little content creation. If our sources got things right, the entertainment market covers $600 to $1000 range, depending on the package.

The third market segment is “On the go”, and Intel focus is on the productivity with efficiency for people always on the go. It should paint a perfect balance of performance, style and battery life, packed in thin and light form factor. This one usually gets significantly more expensive than basic and entertainment market segment, but entertainment notebooks also tend to go in upper price range. Prices should start from below $700 to more than $1000.

Content creation is the fourth market segment and notebooks of this segment can offer high speed video editing, picture and music creation with editing. This should be a powerful machine, and probably not that cheap either. Intel thinks that this market segment starts from $900 and goes over $1000 with no clear limit.

The fifth market segment, you might guess is the gaming market. As the name suggests gaming should be the best on these notebooks and if gaming goes fast it usually means that media experience is also fine. This market segment, according to Intel starts at $900 and goes toward many thousands for extremely powerful gaming machine.

Netbook also stays alive but this is a different market segment and Ultrabook probably covers a few of these market segments, but since it’s still not available it doesn’t currently cover any of this market segments.
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