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Friday, 30 September 2011 09:59

Apple can keep its machines pure

Written by Nick Farell
apple

Does not have to sully them with other software
Apple has won the right to keep its computers free of rival operating systems. Circuit Judge Mary Schroeder wrote in her opinion that Apple's Mac OS X  licensing agreement was indeed enforceable against Psystar, which had
sold non-Mac computers with Mac OS X installed.

Psystar claimed that the OS X licensing agreement was an "unlawful attempt to extend copyright protection to products that are not copyrightable."The Ninth Circuit chucked that idea out.

Pystar had been making hacktintoshes which ran OSx until Apple sued the outfit. In late 2009, US District Judge William Alsup ruled that Psystar violated Apple's copyrights when distributing Mac OS X with its machines.

The ruling is important for Apple because it means that it is legally justfied in keeping its oppressing control freak business model with its closed ecosystem. It means that the  company can keep technological controls to ensure
that only approved applications are used in connection with the operating systems.


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Comments  

 
+1 #1 The blue fox 2011-09-30 18:25
Why OSX? there are so many better OS's out there.
 

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