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Thursday, 06 October 2011 12:31

Oracle finally loves the cloud

Written by Nick Farell
oracle

Database outfit and clouds, why did it ever fight it
Oracle has finally worked out that the Cloud is the right place for a dull outfit like a database company to end up.

Ellison has not been happy about using the C word and has been late in bringing his company into the cloud. Oracle has developed an ambitious array of cloud computing services in a bid to catch up with Amazon and Salesforce.

When Larry Ellison unveiled them he was jolly enthusiastic. This is a complete conversion to several years ago when he mocked cloud computing. The new offerings include an "Oracle Public Cloud" and software for managing tasks such as sales and human resources, a database, security technology and a platform for writing Web applications with Oracle's widely used Java software.

Ellison said that programs and data that Oracle hosts on its cloud can easily be moved to a customer's own data centre or Amazon's rival cloud. However it would not be compatible with web-based offerings from rival Salesforce.com, which runs on proprietary standards that are not compatible with other networks.


Nick Farell

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