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Wednesday, 26 October 2011 12:22

AIBs concerned about 28nm GPUs

Written by



Poor yields and slow demand expected


With the most uneventful year in graphics behind us, many punters were expecting a very interesting start to 2012, courtesy of new 28nm chips.

However, not all is great and graphics cards makers are starting to express concerns about upcoming chips and the transition to TSMCs 28nm process. Both AMD and Nvidia are scheduled to launch their first 28nm parts within a couple of months, but even now AIBs have serious reservations about yield rates, which could translate to pricier chips. The transition to 40nm in 2009 was pretty slow and painful, so apparently it still weighs heavily on the minds of AIB execs.

The other source of concern is weakening demand for discrete graphics and decreasing margins. Demand for discrete graphics is declining and the drop in mid-range and entry-level markets is particularly alarming. Many consumers and system integrators are relying on integrated graphics in ever increasing numbers, and who could blame them? Integrated graphics have come a long was over the past couple of years and the vast majority of consumers simply don’t need low-end discrete cards, as they don’t bring much more to the table.

Both AMD and Nvidia are expected to launch their first 28nm products by the end of the year, but in reality volume availability isn’t expected until early 2012 and it still remains to be seen how long it will take AMD and Nvidia to transition to 28nm across the board.

Digitimes claims some vendors will choose to play it safe and watch how the market develops before they make any decisions, which means the transition could be even slower than expected. It’s quite understandable, AIBs don’t want to get burned, especially not in a situation when most of them are struggling to keep up with low margins and slow demand anyway.

More here.



Last modified on Wednesday, 26 October 2011 12:32
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Comments  

 
+1 #1 STRESS 2011-10-26 12:36
This is going to hurt the green team a lot more since they have no integrated solution
 
 
+3 #2 dicobalt 2011-10-26 14:14
Who really cares? All games are crappy console ports that run well on just about anything that isn't integrated or low end. Only people who decide to do multi monitor gaming really need to pay attention to graphics cards these days.
 
 
-1 #3 nforce4max 2011-10-26 14:48
They can count me out given the poor overall quality of most cards these days. Especially Fermi era cards that start to crap out after a few months use.
 
 
-1 #4 godrilla 2011-10-26 22:22
Quoting STRESS:
This is going to hurt the green team a lot more since they have no integrated solution

What about arm? Tegra 4 and project denver being 8 core cpus with 60/250 cores of gpu the later being campatible to directx 11 (rumored), windows 8, and a server x86 replacement for telsa business!

Nvidia is doing better than AMD if you ask me and is in a better position, AMD does not even have a mobile chip where the real growth is.

And tegra 4 out next year is a 28nm chip while amd is still @ the 32nm level.

The only thing AMD has going for them is the apu, server, and gpu business. And next gen consoles chips.
 
 
0 #5 012013014 2011-10-26 23:01
Quote:
Who really cares? All games are crappy console ports that run well on just about anything that isn't integrated or low end. Only people who decide to do multi monitor gaming really need to pay attention to graphics cards these days.

100% agree..
 
 
-1 #6 Ferdinand 2011-10-31 20:42
Quoting godrilla:
The only thing AMD has going for them is the apu, server, and gpu business. And next gen consoles chips.

Nvidia has a mobile soc and gpu business. The only things AMD has going for them is Netbooks, Laptops, Desktops, GPU, APU and console graphics. Must be great being Nvidia...
 
 
0 #7 godrilla 2011-10-31 20:56
Quoting Ferdinand:
Quoting godrilla:
The only thing AMD has going for them is the apu, server, and gpu business. And next gen consoles chips.

Nvidia has a mobile soc and gpu business. The only things AMD has going for them is Netbooks, Laptops, Desktops, GPU, APU and console graphics. Must be great being Nvidia...

All I meant is that AMD needs to get into the mobile business too,

And because you mentioned it, amd is in the PS3? Or is it nvidia gpu?

Nvida not in desktops? Notebooks? Netbooks? Servers/ supercomputers, workstations?auto Gps like audi , phones? Tablets? Ok buddy
 

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