Featured Articles

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC has announced that it will begin volume production of 16nm FinFET products in the second half of 2015, in late…

More...
AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD has missed earnings targets and is planning a substantial job cuts. The company reported quarterly earnings yesterday and the street is…

More...
Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

As expected, Google has finally released the eagerly awaited Nexus 6 phablet and its first 64-bit device, the Nexus 9 tablet.

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 08 November 2011 12:55

Apple gets around iPhone and iPad ban in Germany

Written by Nick Farell



Android war continues in Europe


Jobs' Mob's legal war to remove competition in the EU has hit a snag in that one of its rival's legal tactics has actually worked.

Theoretically it should be illegal to sell an iPad or an iPhone in Germany after a Mannheim judge issued the default judgement on Friday, after Apple failed to defend itself against Motorola's claims that it nicked its ideas. Motorola accused Apple of violating two patents in its mobile products.

However Apple has responded to the news by saying it was "a procedural issue [that] has nothing to do with the merits of the case". An Apple spokesman said that the default judgement "does not affect our ability to do business or sell products in Germany at this time". This is because Motorola sued Apple, the US parent company, and not Apple GmbH, the company's local subsidiary.

However patent commentator Florian Mueller tells us that Apple's German online store appears to be run by Apple and the parent company also has to deliver more iPhones and iPads to its German branch if it is to continue selling products in that country, once current retail stocks have been depleted. If the court gets miffed at this, Apple could face a fines of up to €250k for each violation, and a German court could even call for a six-month prison sentence for Apple execs.

More here.


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments