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Friday, 11 November 2011 15:39

Exceleram announces new 32GB quad-channel kit

Written by Slobodan Simic

exceleram logo

For the upcoming Sandy Bridge-E platform


Exceleram has announced its latest memory kit that will be a part of the Grand DDR3-series, the Exceleram 32GB 1333MHz quad-channel kit.

Consisting of four 8GB modules set to work at 1333MHz with CL 9-9-9-24 latencies at 1.5V, the new 32GB quad-channel kit features Exceleram's standard low profile red heatspreaders, so there will be no problem with those large heatsinks. The kit is, of course, intended and tested for Intel's upcoming Sandy Bridge E platform.

The same modules will also be available as a single or dual-channel kit with same specs as the quad one and the price is set at around US $312 for the 32GB model, US $156 for the 16GB one and US $75,60 for the single 8GB module.

exceleram 32gbquadgrand_1


Last modified on Friday, 11 November 2011 16:09
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Comments  

 
+1 #1 Super XP 2011-11-11 18:56
This is great, but DDR3-1333? that is way too slow, I rather see DDR3 1866 at those prices.
 
 
+2 #2 Naterm 2011-11-11 20:53
Yeah, because it's proven that faster memory really scales well with Sandy Bridge...oh wait...

In the first pass of an H.264 encode, you get about 4-5% when going from DDR3-1333 to DDR3-1866. On the more compute intensive second pass, you get about 1.5%.

The prices are fairly reasonable compared to the 8GB DIMM kits I've seen floating around. I've never heard of this company, I don't know if their products are widely available in the US. Higher density ICs always cost a good bit more than the current standard because they generally have lower yields.
 

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