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Wednesday, 12 March 2008 09:37

Chemical brain controls nano-machines

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Plan to boost computing power


Researchers
have emerged from their steam-filled labs claiming they have created a a tiny chemical brain that acts as a remote control for swarms of nano-machines. The molecular sized device could control eight microscopic machines simultaneously.

According to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, which Fudo uses as loo paper at Fudzilla central, the scientists want to use the brain to send nanobots to attack tumours.

The brain is made from 17 molecules of the chemical duroquinone. One acts as the control, which sits at the centee of a ring formed by the remaining 16. All are connected by chemical bonds, known as hydrogen bonds.

It could also be used to boost computing power because it can process 16 bits of information simultaneously.
Last modified on Wednesday, 12 March 2008 15:25

Nick Farell

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