Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 15 November 2011 11:50

North Korea enlists Facebook for Juche propaganda

Written by

facebook

Dear Leader likes his “likes”

North Korea is not the first country that comes to mind in terms of social networking or freedom of speech, but the isolated communist state is now resorting to Facebook to get its message across.

North Korea’s official website now offers users the ability to link content to Facebook, Twitter and a few South Korean sites. North Korea has about 10,000 followers on Twitter, which means it is a thousand times less popular than Justin Beiber. Considering Pyongyang’s penchant for starving its population, interning opponents of the regime in concentration camps and threatening nuclear war, this is hardly surprising.

Interestingly, the site links to several South Korean networks, despite the fact that South Korea restricts access to the handful of North Korean sites in existence. However, South Koreans can access the North’s websites through proxies and quite a few of them do, out of morbid curiosity we guess.

More here.
 

Last modified on Tuesday, 15 November 2011 12:39

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments