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Tuesday, 15 November 2011 11:50

North Korea enlists Facebook for Juche propaganda

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facebook

Dear Leader likes his “likes”

North Korea is not the first country that comes to mind in terms of social networking or freedom of speech, but the isolated communist state is now resorting to Facebook to get its message across.

North Korea’s official website now offers users the ability to link content to Facebook, Twitter and a few South Korean sites. North Korea has about 10,000 followers on Twitter, which means it is a thousand times less popular than Justin Beiber. Considering Pyongyang’s penchant for starving its population, interning opponents of the regime in concentration camps and threatening nuclear war, this is hardly surprising.

Interestingly, the site links to several South Korean networks, despite the fact that South Korea restricts access to the handful of North Korean sites in existence. However, South Koreans can access the North’s websites through proxies and quite a few of them do, out of morbid curiosity we guess.

More here.
 

Last modified on Tuesday, 15 November 2011 12:39

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