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Tuesday, 22 November 2011 13:54

Intel rolls out Sandy Bridge based Pentium 350

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intel logo new

15W desktop part for tree huggers

Intel has released a rather interesting Sandy Bridge processor that might very well have the lowest TDP of any non-Atom desktop processor to date.

The Pentium 350 is a dual-core 32nm processor based on the Sandy Bridge architecture and it’s clocked at just 1.2GHz, making for a very energy efficient LGA 1155 package with a 15W TDP. The polar bear friendly chips lacks onboard graphics, but it supports hyperthreading and comes with a rather generous 3MB of L3 cache.

To put things in perspective, the most power efficient Sandy Bridge parts in the desktop segment have a 35W TDP, and 15W is pretty impressive even by mobile standards. For example, the 1.2GHz Pentium U5400 has an 18W TDP. The new Pentium 350 appears to be a derivative of low-voltage Xeon chips, since it supports ECC memory and does not have integrated graphics.

It sounds like an excellent choice for tiny home servers, maybe even HTPC builds and other small form factor machines with an emphasis on low power consumption and noiseless operation. However, Intel has a tendency to slap pretty high price tags on its ultra low voltage parts, so don’t expect it to come cheap.

You check out the full spec at Intel.

Last modified on Wednesday, 23 November 2011 00:00
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Comments  

 
0 #1 dicobalt 2011-11-23 03:05
I wonder if we will be seeing this in netbooks? This CPU still has VT-x and HT too.
 
 
-1 #2 Medallish 2011-11-23 11:08
It's almost pointless as an HTPC CPU since you can't get it without a decent IGP, maybe if you pair it with Ion 2, but even then there won't be any benefits to getting this over a E450, the reason for this is, if you're going to make an HTPC with an embedded video card, you wouldn't just settle with a 15W 1.2GHz CPU.
 
 
0 #3 Jay 2011-11-23 11:27
Slowly & Steadily Intel are turning this x86 more & more power efficient.

By the time ARM for Windows comes out Intel mostly likely will have a competitor to it or so it seems.
 
 
0 #4 maroon1 2011-11-23 11:38
Quoting dicobalt:
I wonder if we will be seeing this in netbooks? This CPU still has VT-x and HT too.




Every modern Intel processor (except Atom) support VT-x
 
 
-1 #5 maroon1 2011-11-23 11:45
Quoting Medallish:
It's almost pointless as an HTPC CPU since you can't get it without a decent IGP, maybe if you pair it with Ion 2, but even then there won't be any benefits to getting this over a E450, the reason for this is, if you're going to make an HTPC with an embedded video card, you wouldn't just settle with a 15W 1.2GHz CPU.

Sandy-bridge based CPU @ 1.2GHz is still way much faster E-450 in CPU performance.

You should read this
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megahertz_myth
 
 
-2 #6 Medallish 2011-11-23 11:57
Quoting maroon1:
Sandy-bridge based CPU @ 1.2GHz is still way much faster E-450 in CPU performance.

You should read this
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megahertz_myth






lol come on use your head, ever heard of scaling? First of all you're wrong, and a moron, but more important, I didn't really say you should stick with the E450 because of speed, more because it has a capable GPU, which makes it easy to build into a small HTPC, if you need to expand with an embedded gfx, why would you even need a 15W CPU? Is SB over 37% faster than K10 clock for clock? Not in most cases, the E450 is clocked over 37% faster than the Pentium 350, CPU wise they should be similar, good luck finding a 3W GPU as good as 6320.
 
 
-1 #7 maroon1 2011-11-23 16:02
Dear Medallish,

I'm using my head more than you do

Brazos is slower clock for clock than even K8 based CPU (let alone K10)

Please look at this CPU benchmarks
http://www.anandtech.com/show/4023/the-brazos-performance-preview-amd-e350-benchmarked/3

The benchmarks shows that i3 330UM 1.2GHz(It is a low voltage CPU) is day and night faster than E350. In some cases it is almost twice as fast.

Pentium 350 has similar specification as i3 330UM (1.2GHz and HT). However Pentium 350 is based on superior sandy bridge architecture. So, it is even faster than i3 330UM.

I showed you a proof that you wrong (look at anandtech review). Can you now apologize for insulting me?
 
 
-1 #8 Medallish 2011-11-24 09:54
Dear Moroon1

As I said in my previous post, which was the reason for the insults to begin with, I didn't mention CPU speed, rather questioned the useability of a low speed low power CPU in a HTPC, where you'll need an embedded video card, this simply makes no sense, if you're going to make a low power HTPC, using an embedded card you might as well get a 35W I3, however if you want low-power yes the E450, is the better choice, not only because of the IGP, that makes it much more suitable for small cases, but also considering price. now I was mistaken on the whole K8/K10 issue, and that's my bad, you're still a moron for turning this into a discussion about CPU speed when that was never the issue I had with it.
 
 
0 #9 Medallish 2011-11-24 10:30
Since I'm guessing a certain person won't get my point I'll try and say it as simple as possible.
If you want to make a low power, and small cased HTPC, solutions like E350/E450 on a Mini-itx board, is probably the best solution out there, and when I mean small case, I mean really small, with no room for expansion cards(or video cards), once you go beyond that size and you have room for expansions, there's pretty much no reason at all to use a 15W CPU only, especially not one that's likely to come at a premium price, and even though it's faster than the E450, It's still slow at the tasks you link to, and HTPC is about Media, not CPU speed.

You can edit away your mistakes, but I still got the mail with the reply, you can't get Pentium 350 with IGP, therefore, it's pointless.
 

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