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Monday, 28 November 2011 10:42

Wikleaks boss falls out with British press

Written by Nick Farell



It should write what I say


Wikileaks boss Julian Assange is furious at the British press for not writing what he tells them.

Assange said that the British media was the "credit-stealing, credit-whoring, backstabbing industry" he has ever encountered. Most of the problems have come because Assange fell out with senior journalists at The Guardian newspaper. According to a film, to be aired on More4 tomorrow, a pact to publish the contents of more than 75,000 leaked US cables in a deal between The Guardian, The New York Times and Germany's Der Spiegel went interminably sour.

Assange is still embroiled in a fight to avoid extradition to Sweden where he faces allegations of being a bad sex date, which is a crime in Sweden. In the flick Assange brands The Guardian's David Leigh as "deplorable" and retaliates at his colleague, Nick Davies, who brands Assange an "extraordinarily dishonest man".

As well making Assange famous, WikiLeaks sparked aninternational diplomatic crisis especially after the broken pact between the papers led to a further batch of cables alleged to include the names of Afghan informers, making them vulnerable to reprisals.

Assange admitted he cocked up on that one but blamed the US military and that information "should never have been included... and falsely classified". True Stories: WikiLeaks, shows how Assange was miffed when The New York Times after it threatened to inform the White House of the contents of some of the cables.

Nick Farell

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