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Monday, 28 November 2011 11:44

Microsoft patents spying on employees

Written by Nick Farell

microsoft

Warns of bad behavior

Software giant, Microsoft has patented a machine that can monitor the behavior of employees while also assigning positive or negative scores to everything they do.

According to GeekWire, the patent send the IT department a flag when someone who repeatedly cuts off colleagues during conversations, or warns when a supervisor who repeatedly bugs underlings during their lunch break. Such scoring would presumably rely upon subjective criteria set by the employer regarding what counts as “good” or “bad” work habits.

The range of possible monitored behaviours includes word phrases, body gestures, and mannerisms “such as wearing dark glasses in a video conference” or “wearing unacceptable clothing to a business meeting”. If Microsoft’s idea is adopted then workplace surveillance another step forward by creating software capable of analysing those human behaviours.

The idea is that workers might benefit from such monitoring software by getting feedback about their behaviour. In our experience workers want to be left alone and it is not helpful to point out what people do wrong.

More here.


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Comments  

 
+5 #1 sidje 2011-11-28 12:32
Strangely reminiscent of 1984...
 
 
+3 #2 dicobalt 2011-11-28 15:21
This software is clearly for call centers. It's also good for creating hostile working environments and promoting internal fraud and security problems through the process of angering employees. Let's see what this software has to say about the managers who use this software to over analyze their employees.
 
 
0 #3 youserzero 2011-11-29 03:34
Quoting dicobalt:
This software is clearly for call centers. It's also good for creating hostile working environments and promoting internal fraud and security problems through the process of angering employees.


Me thinks you nailed it on the head. Looks very similar to this article (Microsoft UK is slammed by its staff) about how the scoring system is miss-used by various managers at MS.

http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2126448/microsoft-uk-slammed-staff
 

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