Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

AMD Never Settle Forever bundle hits 200-series cards

AMD Never Settle Forever bundle hits 200-series cards

AMD’s Never Settle bundles have been around for a while and the community response has been extremely positive. When AMD launched…

More...
AMD shipping Beema APUs

AMD shipping Beema APUs

According to Lisa Su, SVP & GM, Global Business Units at AMD, Beema notebook parts have started shipping to manufacturers last…

More...
IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 29 November 2011 11:23

Nvidia loses more market share to AMD

Written by



Overall discrete share remains surprisingly strong


Nvidia is hoping to grab a lot of GPU design wins in 2012, courtesy of Apple and upcoming Ivy Bridge notebooks, but the outfit is currently struggling to keep up with AMD and Intel in the GPU space.

The introduction of integrated graphics on Sandy Bridge and Llano generation is expected to start slowly chipping away at overall low-end discrete graphics sales, but Nvidia is losing share to AMD at the same time. According to FBR’s quarterly PC system tracker survey, Nvidia’s overall share dropped to 15 from 17 percent over the past 18 months. Since the survey focuses on complete systems, the results should be taken with a grain of salt, as we are not sure how it covered the upgrade/enthusiast retail sales.

However, Nvidia also lost some ground to AMD in the discrete space and it now commands a 41 percent share, down from 45 percent. Curiously, the report found that discrete graphics attach rates have remained largely stable in the notebook market and they even increased in the desktop space over the past 18 months, which seems rather baffling.

FBR offers an explanation, though. Traditional users of low-end desktops are apparently shifting to notebooks, leaving the market to enthusiasts and gamers. At the same time, low-end notebook users are turning to tablets, thus maintaining the discrete GPU share in notebooks. So, if you ever wondered who is buying tablets to begin with, it seems to be people who first realized they didn’t need a desktop and now they are figuring out they can do without notebooks, too.

More here.



blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
+3 #1 JAB Creations 2011-11-29 11:41
The bump issue in the 8xxx series I think killed one of my 8800GT cards but I can't say as it was past the warranty when it happened.

Secondly Nvidia cards run HOT. My 8800GT idled underclocked (as far as it would go without crashing, about 280/280) and would still hit 160F, granted it was a single slot card but my 5770 doesn't even hit that at maxed stable clocks under full load.

Thirdly SLI is difficult to setup on AMD systems (there were one or two boards using the Nvidia chipset available for socket AM3). This is now slightly less of an issue with socket AM3+.

I think Nvidia should REALLY work on the heat problem. There was a 9xxx feature for SLI I think that completely turned off the 2nd card, THAT was something I really wanted.
 
 
-9 #2 milkod2001 2011-11-29 12:58
5770 was first 40nm GPU from AMD and comparing it to 2 years older 8800gt does NOT make sense,
SLI or CROSSFIRE sucks anyway, it's always better to rely on powerfull single core GPU than expecting some miracles from 2 cheap cards in SLI or CROSSFIRE.
 
 
+3 #3 Bl0bb3r 2011-11-29 13:14
Also what's the point of talking about really old cards? They won't fix anything anymore. They sold "defective" chips, you bought into them and that's the end of the story.
 
 
+12 #4 majorpayne 2011-11-29 14:24
Quoting milkod2001:
5770 was first 40nm GPU from AMD


Dude it was 4770.
 
 
-7 #5 faildozzer 2011-11-29 17:13
Quoting JAB Creations:
I think Nvidia should REALLY work on the heat problem. There was a 9xxx feature for SLI I think that completely turned off the 2nd card, THAT was something I really wanted.


you clearly deluded bro - tell me,how can high -end GTX580 or GTX570 be cooler than mid-range 6870?
If anybody should work on heat problem,its deffo amd - use google and look around forums,its amd have problems with heat,they use crap coolers (going cheapo way),its a amd fagboys myth that Nv cards hot - currently my GTX580 idles at 26C - show me amd high-end (sorry,middle-end,as amd dont have high-end :D )card that can do that and on full load ~50-54C
 
 
-1 #6 ajvitaly 2011-11-29 17:43
This report does not paint Nvidia's business model accurately. It groups discrete, IGP, and APU's into one category. If separated, Nvidia has about 2% of the IGP market (slowly dwindling down to nothing because Nvidia does not compete in this market) and 60% of the discrete market.

I personally do not consider the crap built onto Intel's CPU's a GPU. It is adequate for web surfing mom's and grandpa's, but an informed who wants to game or do professional graphics work will either use a laptop with a discrete GPU, or will buy a discrete GPU for their desktop.
 
 
-1 #7 nele 2011-11-29 18:43
Quoting ajvitaly:
This report does not paint Nvidia's business model accurately. It groups discrete, IGP, and APU's into one category. If separated, Nvidia has about 2% of the IGP market (slowly dwindling down to nothing because Nvidia does not compete in this market) and 60% of the discrete market.

I personally do not consider the crap built onto Intel's CPU's a GPU. It is adequate for web surfing mom's and grandpa's, but an informed who wants to game or do professional graphics work will either use a laptop with a discrete GPU, or will buy a discrete GPU for their desktop.



Sorry, I have to disagree. I use integrated graphics on my HTPC and notebook - I just don't need anything better.

As for the report itself, you are right and the article states the results don't paint the full picture.
 
 
-4 #8 ajvitaly 2011-11-29 22:35
Quoting nele:
Sorry, I have to disagree. I use integrated graphics on my HTPC and notebook - I just don't need anything better.

As for the report itself, you are right and the article states the results don't paint the full picture.


It sounds like you fall right in line with my "websurfing mom and grandpa's" category. If you're doing gaming and professional graphics work on your notebook and/or HTPC, then you are severely limiting your performance.
 
 
+3 #9 123s 2011-11-29 23:23
Just the "websurfing mom and grandpa´s" marked is pretty huge. + integrated gpus are more then fine for office pcs, that are easy majority.
 
 
-2 #10 trajan2448 2011-11-29 23:46
The big profits are in the high end and pro market where Nvidia does extremely well. They can sell one pro GPU for thousands where as low end discrete you need to sell a thousand to make an equal profit.
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments