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Thursday, 01 December 2011 09:50

Disaster recovery plans nearly useless

Written by Nick Farell

 



More than half are dormant

Blackberry's legendary outage could happen to almost half of businesses, because they are ill-prepared to deal with downtime and unexpected disruption to operations.

ControlCircle, a leading UK managed services provider has just carried out a survey of CIOs/COOs/IT heads and discovered that while 90 per cent of them had a strategy in place, only 46 per cent had reviewed and tested their business continuity procedures in the last twelve months.

More than 42 per cent had either no strategy in place or were unsure when it was last tested. Over half of strategies were more than two years old. Another half of those surveyed said it would take several hours for systems to be restored in the event of a disaster or fault. Over one third of those surveyed admitted it would take in excess of 24 hours to resume normal business operations.

ControlCircle CEO Carmen Carey said that the results were shocking but are consistent with our anecdotal conversations and insight into many organisations today.

“Most organisations see disaster recovery as a considerable expense to the business when in reality, it’s the cost of downtime that is immeasurable. Imagine how much damage you can do to your brand with three days of downtime?” he said.

He added that companies should be reviewing minutes versus hours as part of their strategy, especially now so much of today’s business is based online.

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
-1 #1 xrodney 2011-12-01 11:06
Useless study.
It should be done for specific systems type, not everything in one pack.
Its one thing recover simple web-server or complex system that ave many dependent servers connected together and in case of failure of one you need to recover all to ensure data consistency.
Even High Availability systems that multiply your IT costs are not 100% prone to issues and you can easily end with point in time recovery that can takes 24 hours or even more.
 
 
0 #2 AdityaJayaram 2011-12-15 13:32
Interesting insight from the survey on business continuity programs implemented by businesses and technology firms,business continuity programs can help businesses cope with disasters and prevent loss of proprietary data.Just read an interesting white paper Protect against a potential disaster with an effective business continuity plan @http://bit.ly/vJfe2C
 

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