Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 01 December 2011 12:27

Snoopy rootkit in Android, RIM and Symbian exposed

Written by



Herman Cain tweets sigh of relief from his iPhone


Conspiracy theorists look out. Security researcher Trevor Eckhart has exposed a potentially very serious rootkit hidden deep in the operating systems of many Android, Blackberry and Nokia phones.

Millions of phones apparently feature a sneaky piece of software dubbed Carrier IQ and Eckhart claims the software is nearly impossible to spot and it cannot be disabled or removed. What’s more, he claims the software not only records the device’s location, but also records every keystroke on some handsets.

Understandably, the makers of Carrier IQ dismiss the findings and claim their benevolent piece of code is merely there to provide telecoms with information needed to diagnose reception problems and improve their service. Exactly how this is achieved through logging keystrokes in anyone’s guess.

The company filed a cease-and-desist order against Eckhart, but failed to silence him. Law professor Paul Ohm thinks there is a good chance the software is violating federal wiretapping laws in the US.

“If CarrierIQ has gotten the handset manufactures to install secret software that records keystrokes intended for text messaging and the Internet and are sending some of that information back somewhere, this is very likely a federal wiretap,” he said.

So, in the unlikely case that CarrierIQ really did store or send recorded keystrokes anywhere, phone makers could be looking at the mother of all class-action suits.

Last modified on Thursday, 01 December 2011 12:30
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments