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Friday, 02 December 2011 09:48

Intel boss thrilled with Windows 8

Written by



One of the best things ever


Intel CEO Paul Otellini believes Windows 8 is the next black and he is not concerned by the fact that it will open the door to ARM-based PCs.

Speaking at a tech conference organized by Credit Suisse, Otellini described the upcoming OS as “one of the best things that’s ever happened to our company.” Otellini dismissed the ARM threat, saying ARM-based computers will be plagued by some issues, namely support for legacy applications.

However, Windows 8 cuts both ways. Although it will offer support for non-x86 chips for the first time, the new OS will also allow Intel to gain a foothold in the emerging tablet market. Otellini described Windows 8 as a “very good operating system,” not just for PCs, but also tablets.

Otellini believes the advantages of x86 chips in the tablet market lay in legacy applications, including shedloads of drivers, ranging from printers to digital cameras. He claims legacy driver support will be a major coup for Intel, even in menial tasks such as copying photos from a digital camera to a tablet.

“Try that if you don’t have a driver, doesn’t work. On the other hand, if that tablet is running [an extension] of Windows, it’s going to work just like it works with the PC today,” he said.

In spite of the tablet hype and the slowdown in demand for regular PCs, Otellini reckons there is nothing to worry. He is confident that PC sales will be driven by demand from India, Brazil, China and other large but underdeveloped markets with an emerging middle class. That is, until their middle class starts buying stuff they don’t need with money don’t have and ends up like the US middle class.

More here.



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Comments  

 
+4 #1 Bors Mistral 2011-12-02 15:00
Some of the "legacy support" really needs a cut, bad.
 
 
+1 #2 Haberlandt 2011-12-02 16:47
Quote:
That is, until their middle class starts buying stuff they don’t need with money don’t have and ends up like the US middle class.
Lololol.
 
 
0 #3 fteoath64 2011-12-03 07:35
Intel ought to focus on home server market (headless) and home NAS markets which are clearly unexplored markets and play well with smartphone and tablets. Granted they cannot make a decent low-price tablet but these other accessories are huge in terms of volumes and they play real nice with all sorts of PCs and laptops as well. Just Go Do it Intel.
 
 
0 #4 youserzero 2011-12-04 01:04
Quote:
Otellini dismissed the ARM threat, saying ARM-based computers will be plagued by some issues, namely support for legacy applications.


Andriod and iOS tablets run on ARM CPUs, yet I've never heard of anyone complaining that they couldn't run "legacy applications".
 
 
0 #5 owned66 2011-12-04 12:12
Quoting youserzero:
Quote:
Otellini dismissed the ARM threat, saying ARM-based computers will be plagued by some issues, namely support for legacy applications.


Andriod and iOS tablets run on ARM CPUs, yet I've never heard of anyone complaining that they couldn't run "legacy applications".


he is talking about windows
and by legacy applications he means old x86 software
for example all software made for x86 wont work on arm
drivers for almost anything on windows wont work on it (external devices etc)
 
 
0 #6 youserzero 2011-12-05 00:13
Quoting owned66:
he is talking about windows


Well obviously he is talking about windows. My point is less than 1% of people care, windows or not.

Quoting owned66:
for example all software made for x86 wont work on arm


Only true for BINARIES. This is a problem for windows as it has (had) many parts coded in assembly. If you develop software the correct way all you need to do is recompile your source for whatever architecture you want.
 
 
0 #7 karlsbad 2011-12-05 19:10
I'd like to see Windows h8 use RAM caching using "unused" available RAM to cache temporary internet files for faster responsiveness. Most of the time, my Windows 7 64 bit Enterprise is not using any installed RAM above 6 GB.
 

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