Featured Articles

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia’s original Shield console launched last summer to mixed reviews. It went on sale in the US and so far Nvidia…

More...
AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

We had a chance to talk about AMD’s upcoming products with John Byrne, Chief Sales Officer, AMD. We covered a number…

More...
AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

We had a chance to talk to John Byrne who spent the last two years as Senior Vice President and Chief…

More...
OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OnePlus is one of the few small companies that might disrupt the Android phone market, dominated by giant outfits like Samsung.…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 07 December 2011 12:45

Amazon in hot water over Kindle Fire

Written by Nick Farell

Amazon Logo

That should be steam

Amazon's Kindle Fire tablet, has apparently angered parents who think that the gadget makes it too easy for their children to buy stuff they like.

The Kindle Fire comes with your Amazon account information preloaded, along with "1-Click" ordering. That means anyone who is holding that device can place an order, whether it's their account or not. No prompts come up to confirm the purchase or ask for a password.

Scenic Labs founder Jason Rosenfeld said his three year old daughter using the device and clicked on an image of a children's product that appeared on the screen because it was in his shopping history. Of course, in a world where everything revolves around breeding and protecting breeders spawn so that they can populate the gene pool with more over protected runts, this a major problem.

No one thinks “shit don't give a three year old a tablet, she will be happy with a soft toy”. Instead Amazon is in trouble for not configuring its tablet in case some dippy parent gives a tablet to a toddler.

Of course, Reuters points out that would never happen to an Apple parent as there are all sorts of toddler protections on its gear. With Apple gear you just have to worry about yourself over spending within its walled gardens of delights and the three-fold more expensive price tag.

In an email in response to questions from Reuters about Kindle Fire, Amazon did not address concerns about the "1-Click" ordering, but says it has provided the ability for parents to limit what their kids buy when using applications downloaded for the devices. Kurt Roemer, chief security strategist for Citrix Systems, says parents and other users should understand what the Kindle Fire is and how it works before letting anyone use one.

In short don't give it to your stupid bubble-wrapped brat.

More here.


Last modified on Wednesday, 07 December 2011 14:27
blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
+1 #1 Dribble 2011-12-07 15:11
I take i Nick doesn't have a "3 year old brat". Most young kids love tablets - they are very intuitive to use and there's plenty of fun and educational software on there for them. I've seen iPad gen toddlers walk up to tv not understand why nothing happens when you drag your figure across the screen :)

Anyway if amazon isn't putting protections in so someone randomly playing with it can buy stuff that's a problem - and not just if you let your toddler near it.
 
 
+1 #2 ET3D 2011-12-07 15:38
Quoting Dribble:
I take i Nick doesn't have a "3 year old brat".


Agreed. Anyone suggesting a soft toy for a three year old obviously doesn't have one. (That's disregarding the previous paragraph which made Nick Farrell sound like a real child hater. I was still unsure at that point. :))

Personally I don't see myself letting my daughter use a tablet unsupervised, but I can definitely see a tablet as an alternative to watching TV and other such activities. Kids do like to consume media and interact, and a tablet is the easiest to use device for that.

The article also raised the point about the device being stolen and the thief being able to order easily.
 
 
0 #3 mrbones 2011-12-07 16:13
What awful commentary. He always hates on Apple and now kids. You should stick to just reporting the news.
 
 
+2 #4 m3rdpwr 2011-12-07 19:21
I bought my one year old one of those $100 Archos 7" Tablet's.

She know's how to use it quite well.

She loves to draw, create shortcut's, zip through pic's, change backgrounds, etc.

I think it's great until she sneaks in my office, turns on my PC and starts to use it. haha
 
 
+3 #5 FakeJ 2011-12-07 21:25
"No one thinks “shit don't give a three year old a tablet, she will be happy with a soft toy”. Instead Amazon is in trouble for not configuring its tablet in case some dippy parent gives a tablet to a toddler."

Haha, bravo sir. definitely the parent at fault here not Amazon. Also, lets not forget that the Fire is just a mobile cash register for Amazon, so this is really akin to giving a toddler a credit card.
 
 
+1 #6 Hemi345 2011-12-08 00:58
-------
Instead Amazon is in trouble for not configuring its tablet in case some dippy parent gives a tablet to a toddler.
-------
Obviously you haven't seen all the marketing for the apps and children books that specifically target that age group.

My 3 year old daughter loves my wife's Nook Color. It's the perfect device to keep an energetic child entertained for while with the games and read along books. B&N had the foresight to build in the option to require a password before a purchase is made... This shouldn't have even been an question to implement on the Kindle Fire. Idiots.
 
 
0 #7 bbo320 2011-12-08 02:58
If you give a child ANY kind of internet-enabled device unsupervised, YOU are at fault.
 
 
-1 #8 Hemi345 2011-12-08 18:46
Quoting bbo320:
If you give a child ANY kind of internet-enabled device unsupervised, YOU are at fault.


Says another person that doesn't have kids...

Why were electric window locks installed in cars? Why is the maximum legal spacing on spindles in a railing 4"? Why are drop side cribs illegal now? All because a parent cannot watch their child every second of every day. It only takes a second for the child to toggle between the book they were reading and purchase a 70" LCD TV. I'm thinking Amazon is banking on the the impulse/accidental purchases and 15-20% for restocking fees to backfill their losses on the Kindle Fire...
 
 
+1 #9 niteblade 2011-12-09 01:18
I really don't know what all this talk is of the Kindle and other Androids being kid-unsafe is. There are apps available that lock down your device so your kids wont go where they shouldn't. We installed Kids Place, set up the list of apps they could execute, set up the market purchase blocker and there were no more problems. Its not like there is an inherent deficiency in these devices - other than the ruggedness everything else can be solved with software.
 
 
0 #10 Northernboy28 2011-12-27 02:12
Quote:
Says another person that doesn't have kids...


Wow Hemi, can you be any more of a self-centered parental douche...

Love how people who have kids are somehow instantly infallible... guess what hemi, it is your responsibly, you've hear that word haven't you, to police your kids not amazon's. Hate how some parents seem to think everything should revolve around the life they chose for their kids, and its a problem that they should supervise what they do
Yeah hemi I don't have kids but I'm glad I didn't have a parent like you...
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments