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Friday, 09 December 2011 15:40

AMD Tahiti needs 8-pin and 6-pin power connectors

Written by Slobodan Simic

radeon logo_new

For both HD 7950 and HD 7970


We've been fed whispers that indicate final versions of Tahiti based cards, known for now as the HD 7950 and the HD 7970, will both feature 8-pin and 6-pin PCI-Express power connectors.

If you do some simple math this means that the HD 7970 will have a maximum power draw under 300W while the HD 7950 will need more than 225W. The PCI-Express motherboard slot offers up to 75W of power, 6-pin adds another 75W and 8-pin can pump 150W of power. This is a pretty strange move as the HD 6950 ended below 225W and thus needed only two 6-pin PCI-E power connectors but that will apparently change with the HD 7900 series.

The recently pixellized Tahiti cards both had 8-pin solders, but it was expected considering we were looking at ES type cards. According to what we know so far, AMD advises a ~500W PSU for the Radeon HD 7970 and that is 100W less than what Nvidia asks for the GTX 580 and somewhere around the GTX 560 Ti. This can be cosidered a great improvement if the rumoured performance turns out to be true. 

Of course, these are still rumours but we are sure that we'll have official details pretty soon as we draw closer to the rumored January 10th launch date.

Last modified on Friday, 09 December 2011 16:08
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Comments  

 
+1 #1 Leibritz 2011-12-09 16:24
Vortez has already shown some pictures, looks like double 8pin to me...

Edit - my bad, 8+6 it is :)
 
 
+2 #2 stoneeh 2011-12-09 16:25
Let's hope that kind of power consumption means an equal lot of gaming power.
 
 
0 #3 Leibritz 2011-12-09 17:02
consumption should be equal to the current gen cards, hope the 28nm makes the difference
 
 
0 #4 Exodite 2011-12-09 17:20
This goes against the previously rumored power draw figures of 190W and 150W.

It's also a bit confusing as the high-end stream core count only increases by a third. (~1.5k to ~2k)

While there's 50% more memory as well as other architectural changes it seems odd that those should be enough to push the cards to higher power draw than the previous generation equivalents when moving from 40nm to 28nm.

Time will tell, it just seems quite odd if this is true.
 
 
+2 #5 eddman 2011-12-09 17:51
Quoting Exodite:
It's also a bit confusing as the high-end stream core count only increases by a third. (~1.5k to ~2k)

It's a completely new architecture with emphasize on compute, with bigger and power hungrier shaders.
 
 
+1 #6 Exodite 2011-12-09 18:01
Quoting eddman:
It's a completely new architecture with emphasize on compute, with bigger and power hungrier shaders.



We don't really know how the implementation is done at this point.
 
 
0 #7 godrilla 2011-12-09 18:52
Quoting Leibritz:
Vortez has already shown some pictures, looks like double 8pin to me...

Edit - my bad, 8+6 it is :)


yes here it is

http://vr-zone.com/articles/amd-southern-islands-tahiti--hd-7900-pictured/14183.html
 
 
-2 #8 eddman 2011-12-09 20:45
Quoting Exodite:
We don't really know how the implementation is done at this point.

http://www.brightsideofnews.com/news/2011/11/30/radeon-hd-7000-revealed-amd-to-mix-gcn-with-vliw4--vliw5-architectures.aspx

"AMD adopted a smart compute approach. Graphic Core Next is a true MIMD (Multiple-Instruction, Multiple Data) architecture. With the new design, the company opted for "fat and rich" processing cores that occupy more die space, but can handle more data."

Fermi is also MIMD.

None of that is confirmed yet, but BSN has always been trustworthy.
 
 
0 #9 Exodite 2011-12-09 21:12
Quoting eddman:
None of that is confirmed yet...



Point being that we know what it's aiming to do, just not how.

The 2048 stream processors are supposedly arranged in 32 clusters, which make up the new GCN units.

To me that doesn't sound like each stream processor is significantly different, just that the macro-arrangement and possibly how they're exposed to the rest of the hardware is.

Which shouldn't require significantly more die real estate.

We just don't know yet.
 
 
0 #10 eddman 2011-12-09 22:32
Quoting Exodite:
...

Ok, but do stream processors, or should I say ALUs, remain the same throughout generations? Don't they lose or gain functionalities ?
AFAIK they change. That's what I gather from GPU analysis articles.

This, for example:

"The 4 slim ALUs handle all of their old tricks, so each is capable of 1 FP MAD/ADD/MUL or 1 INT ADD/AND/CMP, as well as integer shifts. Cypress adds to its slim ALUs the capability to do single cycle 24-bit INT MUL whereas before no INT MUL support existed at all. ... There's also FMA support, which will bring benefits versus a simple MAD when it comes to precision loss introduced by rounding involved in the latter."

http://www.beyond3d.com/content/reviews/53/8
 

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