Featured Articles

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia’s original Shield console launched last summer to mixed reviews. It went on sale in the US and so far Nvidia…

More...
AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

We had a chance to talk about AMD’s upcoming products with John Byrne, Chief Sales Officer, AMD. We covered a number…

More...
AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

We had a chance to talk to John Byrne who spent the last two years as Senior Vice President and Chief…

More...
OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OnePlus is one of the few small companies that might disrupt the Android phone market, dominated by giant outfits like Samsung.…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 12 December 2011 10:00

AMD disses GPUs with CPU sockets

Written by Nick Farell



They are like chalk and cheese


AMD claims that banging out special-purpose GPU-based accelerators which are compatible with CPU sockets is completely pointless.

The comments by AMD's leading software expert Neal Robison is completely different from that being mooted by Intel. Chipzilla is backing out accelerators for highly-parallel computing into sockets for central processing units (CPUs).

Robinson told X-bit labs that Fusion-architecture - which integrates general-purpose [x86] processing cores with highly-parallel stream processors of Radeon GPUs - is a better solution for high-performance computing.
He said that it makes more sense from the software developers standpoint" and investments into the "tool has already been made so we might as well use it". It looks like the once proposed Torrenza platform is no longer even considered as viable.

"APU is a better and cleaner solution than sticking a GPU in the same socket," said Neal Robison.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
0 #1 yourma2000 2011-12-12 13:59
I always though that have a GPU that could x86 compute would be the most efficient and powerful kind of APU and would be a true fussion of CPU and GPU
 
 
0 #2 hoohoo 2011-12-12 16:37
I recall back in 2002/2003 that AMD was making hay about that the hypertransport interconnect supported using FPGAs as compute accelerators in socket 940 multiprocessor boards along with Opterons.
 
 
+2 #3 Haberlandt 2011-12-12 17:39
I'd love CPUs to use PCI-E slots. No more socket compatibility issues.
 
 
0 #4 dew111 2011-12-12 21:03
Quoting yourma2000:
I always though that have a GPU that could x86 compute would be the most efficient and powerful kind of APU and would be a true fussion of CPU and GPU



I hope you're joking. From a programmer's point of view this may be the case, but performance per watt would beg to differ. The x86 ISA is a deal-breaker as it requires a lot of fetch and decode circuitry. RISC-like GPUs are much better because they can fetch and decode with a tiny percentage of the circuitry needed for x86. In any case, upcoming GPUs from Nvidia and AMD are featuring x86-addressable vRAM. This should bring many of the benefits of x86 coprocessors without the ISA's baggage.
 
 
+2 #5 Stormkroe 2011-12-13 03:04
I think it's great when these huge companies make absolute statements. It gives us something to laugh at later when they're seen to miss the boat.

3dFX "Transform and Lighting has nothing on our T-buffer"

Intel "X86 is dead and extending it to 64-bit is pointless and something we'll never do."

General Motors "We should be careful with our spending, we might have to file bankruptcy and it's not like someone's just gonna GIVE us the money to get out of debt."
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments