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Monday, 12 December 2011 10:33

AMD working on ultrabook-like designs

Written by



Brazos 2.0 apparently


Intel’s ultrathin and ultrasleek ultrabooks seem to be the new black and the good people of Santa Clara hope to seize a big chunk of the market come 2012.

However, all ultrabooks come with a hefty price tag and this is not something vendors want in a time of economic turmoil. Intel CEO Paul Otellini recently announced that the company’s goal for 2012 was to reduce ultrabook prices to more acceptable levels, $699 to be precise.

Sounds good, but AMD could beat Intel to the punch. According to AMD exec Brian Slattery, talks are already underway with notebook manufacturers to come up with similar designs based on AMD chips. Talks with one unnamed partner are described as “particularly advanced” and we could even see the first designs at CES in January next year.

AMD does not have that many low TDP mobile chips that could end up in ultrathin notebooks, so they will probably be limited to low-end Brazos 2.0 APUs. This is not necessarily a bad thing. Intel’s Core i5 and Core i7 ultra low voltage chips used in ultrabooks cost between $250 and $350, whereas Brazos 2.0 chips should ship at a fraction of the cost.

Of course, Brazos won’t come close to Sandy Bridge in terms of performance and for the time being AMD does not have any low-voltage mobile Llano chips, either. Performance aside, Brazos is still a pretty interesting piece of kit. It offers relatively good graphics and advanced features such as USB 3.0 and SATA 6Gbps for peanuts.

We wouldn’t like to sound prophetic or condescending, but we have already mentioned the possibility of cheap AMD-based ultrathins a few times this year. Although AMD won’t be able to mach Sandy Bridge performance, Brazos based “ultrabooks” could seize the low end part of the ultrathin market, much like Intel’s CULV chips did a couple of years back, with mixed success.

It could be a very interesting development and we will try to find out which notebook manufacturer is on board, i.e. who will get a lot of angry calls and emails from Intel.

More here.



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Comments  

 
-1 #1 saneblane 2011-12-12 19:13
This is just stupid, Intel did what they always do, they stole someone's else idea and form factor (Apple macbook air) and called it something else, why can't that company do anything other than X86, it's getting rediculous now.
 
 
0 #2 D31337Antics 2011-12-12 20:31
Intel helped them design and create the macbook air *face palm*
 
 
-1 #3 saneblane 2011-12-12 21:21
Quoting D31337Antics:
Intel helped them design and create the macbook air *face palm*


Apple made the Air and was open with intel because intel was not a computer maker, and they were telling them the kind of processor that the Air should have, and were showing them why it was important for the cpu to be cool. Get your facts right before you dispute anyone, Double *facepalm*.
 
 
-4 #4 dicobalt 2011-12-12 22:19
Good luck with that strategy. Brazos is a damned terrible competitor to Ivy Bridge.
 
 
0 #5 yourma2000 2011-12-13 03:02
Quoting dicobalt:
Good luck with that strategy. Brazos is a damned terrible competitor to Ivy Bridge.



Triple facepalm! Is anyone going to make a logical comment this week?
 
 
0 #6 dicobalt 2011-12-13 14:44
Quoting yourma2000:
Quoting dicobalt:
Good luck with that strategy. Brazos is a damned terrible competitor to Ivy Bridge.



Triple facepalm! Is anyone going to make a logical comment this week?


Since AMD specifically designed Brazos to compete with Atom and not Ivy Bridge I would say that it is logical.
 
 
0 #7 Medallish 2011-12-13 15:45
Considering that "feeling" wise there's not much difference between a 18W Zacate, and a 17W ULV from Intel, this is probably going to work really well, and with the better graphics on AMD's much cheaper option, AMD could definitely compete with Ultrabooks, sure it might not be as fast as Sandy Bridge, but as I said you can't feel it in most cases, and you get it for a fraction of the price, personally I'm hoping for a 17-20W, one or two Module Trinity to make a appearence in this sector.
 
 
0 #8 dicobalt 2011-12-13 22:19
Quoting Medallish:
Considering that "feeling" wise there's not much difference between a 18W Zacate, and a 17W ULV from Intel, this is probably going to work really well, and with the better graphics on AMD's much cheaper option, AMD could definitely compete with Ultrabooks, sure it might not be as fast as Sandy Bridge, but as I said you can't feel it in most cases, and you get it for a fraction of the price, personally I'm hoping for a 17-20W, one or two Module Trinity to make a appearence in this sector.


I would have to disagree. The "feeling" is totally different. They are two different types of products that do not compete.
 

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