Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 20 December 2011 12:07

Google Nexus tablet touted as game changer

Written by



Provided it succeeds where all others have failed


Over the weekend Google chairman Eric Schmidt told an Italian newspaper that the company could launch its own tablet “of the highest quality” within six months.

Of course, Schmidt did not go into detail, leaving quite a bit of room for speculation and punters were more than willing to oblige. So far Google had a somewhat mixed track record with its Nexus phones, but over at Fudzilla we tend to like them. We are into the whole vanilla Android idea.

However, we find the whole report a bit odd to say the least. Google used its Nexus phones to promote the latest Android iteration and their launch always coincided with the release of major Android versions, e.g. Gingerbread or Ice Cream Sandwich for the Nexus S and Galaxy Nexus respectively. Meanwhile it didn’t bother with tablets when it launched Honeycomb, or ICS for that matter, so we find it somewhat hard to believe that it will launch a tablet months after ICS hits the market.

If Google really does decide to go ahead with its own tablet design, it would probably have to do a lot to differentiate it from the rest of the Android tablet crowd. However, this won’t be easy, at least not in the six-month timeframe. Next generation 28nm quad-core chips suitable for the tablet won’t be around, and Google is unlikely to turn to Nvidia’s Tegra 3. High resolution tablet screens might be available in six months, but we wouldn’t bet on it, either. Finally, Google won’t have a new major Android upgrade in the next few months, as ICS is just rolling out.

So, although the prospect of a high-end Nexus tablet sounds tempting, a grain of salt is advised to say the least.

More here.




blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments