Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 21 December 2011 11:49

Llano shortage might be a thing of the past

Written by Fudzilla staff



New SKUs point to improved yields


The lengthy AMD Llano shortage could be coming to an end, months after the original A6- and A8- series APUs were launched.

Analyst Nathan Brookwood points to the launch of several new variants as s telltale sign of improved production, but it will take some time before we see the effects in the retail market.

"The new parts are basically speed bumps, and I am taking the fact AMD can ship faster versions of A-series chips as an indicator they may be able to improve their availability," he told EE Times.

Brookwood notes that Intel’s Sandy Bridge CPUs still have the upper hands in terms of sheer CPU performance, but AMD has a clear advantage in integrated graphics. Speaking of next generation chips, he expects Intel won’t meet its 22nm launch schedule, so Trinity and Ivy Bridge parts could launch at roughly the same time.

More here.



blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments