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Wednesday, 21 December 2011 12:35

Ivy Bridge brings even better overclocking

Written by Fuad Abazovic



22nm looks good


Initial reports from the Far East indicate that Ivy Bridge parts will offer even better overclocking performance than their predecessors.

The new 22nm CPUs have lower TDP per clock and can do more calculations, which means you can push the clocks even higher. Ivy Bridge comes in March / April 2012 and normally it can work at the same clock as current generation Sandy Bridge parts, but with a lower wattage.

The 3.4GHz quad core with eight threads should be possible even at 77W, but our sources were not sure about the official designation used for 77W parts. They said it should look like Core i7 3000 series with a K suffix. Such parts should be selling for around $350.

Naturally top performance freaks will want go after Sandy Bridge E, Core i7 3900 series currently ruled by the 3.3GHz/ 3.9GHz Core i7 3960X.
 
Ivy Bridge also looks good for notebooks, but as you may imagine, there won’t be much overclocking happening in the notebook arena, at least not in mainstream notebooks, but superior performance per watt will allow vendors to improve battery life and come up with thinner designs.

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