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Tuesday, 27 December 2011 11:47

Intel Anti-Trust case goes to New York

Written by Nick Farell



If it can make it there it can make it anywhere


A federal judge in Delaware has cancelled a February 14 trial of an antitrust case filed against Intel.

New York state asked the court to allow its transfer to a New York state court because it can't  proceed in the court with its claim for damages under its state's laws. Judge Stark had on December 7 granted Intel's motion that some of the claims of New York state fell outside the statute of limitations, which is three years in antitrust cases in Delaware as compared to up to six years in New York state. The judge also disallowed a treble damages claim by New York on behalf of consumers under New York's Donnelly Act.

Intel had contended that the Donnelly Act does not authorise New York to bring a damages claim for harm done to private parties. New York will file in New York state court to seek whatever remedies are available to it there, Schneiderman said. New York claimed charged Intel with a systematic worldwide campaign of "illegal, exclusionary conduct" to maintain its monopoly power and prices in the market for x86 processors.

Nick Farell

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