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Monday, 02 January 2012 12:44

Android hit by scams

Written by Nick Farell



Fake anti-virus programs popular


Kaspersky Lab researcher Denis Maslennikov says that scammers are targeting Android mobile devices with similar offers of phony virus scans and bogus antivirus software.

Writing on the Securelist blog, Maslennikov says that Web searches for popular mobile applications have turned up scam Web sites offering "free" virus scans of mobile devices, including Android. The technique is the same as those which annoyed Microsoft Windows users. They offer free scans while loading your device with trojans.

"Both web pages claim that the user’s device might be infected and that somebody has access to personal data and then will ask the user to check his or her device for malware," Maslennikov said.

Of course a scan of the device returns "positive" results and encourages the mobile device user to "activate" security protections on their device by clicking on a link in the scan results. If you do that you get the Trojan-SMS.AndroidOS. Scavir for Android to play with.

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Comments  

 
0 #1 dicobalt 2012-01-02 14:44
+1 For Apple's closed ecosystem or -1 for users who don't pay attention to what they are doing?
 
 
0 #2 jklauderdale 2012-01-02 16:16
Personal Computer: A computing tool that is for one's personal use. That describes any smartphone, tablet and netbook out there (yes, even Macs). Just because it's not a little beige box doesn't exclude it from being a PC. As such, you really DO need to protect your data on it. Anyone who doesn't do their research on their AV/FW is sort of ASKING to be taken for everything they have.

*Note: That doesn't excuse the malicious pricks who write the misc viruses, just means that it's like leaving your home door open and then wondering how someone just walks right in.
 
 
-1 #3 Dagrim 2012-01-02 18:27
and I thought that android users where smarter then this
 
 
+1 #4 Dagrim 2012-01-02 18:29
Quoting Dagrim:
and I thought that android users where smarter then this

were*
 
 
+1 #5 stephenbrooks 2012-01-02 23:08
Really there should be some sort of anti-malware system built in to Android, so your average end-user doesn't have to actually install it themselves.

The way Windows does it is monthly "malware removal tool" patches sent out from Microsoft.
 

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